Planning Applications Reference:16/05632/FUL

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Type of Application:Full Application
Status:Pending Consideration
Address of Proposal:Cleveland Bath Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR
Ward:Walcot
Proposal:Restoration of historic open-air public swimming pool and associated facilities
Planning Portal Reference Number:PP-05619075
Applicant Name:Cleveland Pools Trust
Agent Name:Donald Insall Associates
Agent Address:1 Harington Place, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 1HF
Case Officer Name:Adrian Neilson
Date Application Received:17/11/2016
Date Application Validated:25/11/2016
Neighbourhood Consultations sent on:28/11/2016
Standard Consultations sent on:14/02/2017
Last advertised on:01/12/2016
Latest Site Notice posted on:07/12/2016
Expiry Date for Consultation :28/12/2016
Target Decision Date20/01/2017
View Associated Documents
ConstraintsWorld Heritage Site,River Avon and Kennet & Avon Canal,Article 4,SSSI - Impact Risk Zones,Agric Land Class 3b,4,5,British Waterways Minor and Householders,British Waterways Major and EIA,MOD Safeguarded Areas,LLFA - Flood Risk Management,Flood Zone 3,Flood Zone 2,Listed Building,Affordable Housing,Conservation Area,Forest of Avon,Hotspring Protection,Article 4,Article 4
Related Property:Cleveland Bath,Cleveland Row,Hampton Row,Bathwick,Bath,BA2 6QR.
Reference Proposal Application Received Status
00/01204/LBA .Repair and rebuilding of existing stone wall after removal of trees08/06/2000Consent
16/05632/FUL .Restoration of historic open-air public swimming pool and associated facilities17/11/2016Pending Consideration
16/05633/LBA .Internal and external alterations for restoration of historic open-air public swimming pool and associated facilities17/11/2016Pending Consideration

The Comments tab lists all public comments received on this application (not statutory consultees, e.g. The Environment Agency, Highways DC, etc). The majority of comments are submitted via our Comments Form through the website and you can expand the comment to view all of the text by clicking on the plus button. A minority of comments are submitted by post or email and it is not possible to include all the text here, however when you expand the comment you will see a link to our Associated Documents page where you can search for the comment.


Name Address Comment type Comment1 Comment2 Comment3 Date
Jenny Cowderoy Fir Tree Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016: 1. Adverse effects on the dramatic intensification of the site and its usage on residential amenity.

a) Unique Character : The Bathwick estate is a set of residential streets, uniquely quiet and relatively traffic-free given its proximity to the centre of Bath. Hampton Row is a cul-de-sac, containing many Grade II listed cottages, and is cherished as a rare example of a traffic and pollution free place to live, where children can play safely in the street. Residents of Hampton Row meet regularly in the street, in the allotments opposite the houses and share pizzas they have cooked in the community pizza oven. As stated in Banes' Character Appraisal of the Bathwick Conservation Area, there is a 'strong community atmosphere' in the Bathwick Estate and it is the enjoyment of the current levels of amenity (traffic free, quiet and peaceful) that lead to the strong community bonds and make this such a special conservation area and worth preserving.

The Cleveland Pools, having always been a cold-water pool with restricted opening hours, used by small numbers annually and on relatively few days of the year has always had low impact on the surrounding streets. Attached is a news cutting showing the opening hours in the height of summer - just 6 hours a day, 6 days a week.

The current proposal vastly increases the size of the overall built structures of the Pools, allowing for extreme and unprecedented intensification of use - over 36,000 visitors per year in order to break-even. It is planned to open 7 days a week for 14 hours per day PLUS additional private events and hire. Overdevelopment of the site, at this unprecedented and extreme scale, will bring huge, adverse effects to this quiet, safe neighbourhood. With visitor numbers expected in the high hundreds, even upwards of 1,000 on popular days, the streets of Bathwick Estate will be very different, with huge numbers of people, noise, litter and traffic. Our children will no longer be able to play out, neighbours will not be enjoying the current levels of peace and quiet.

b) Noise - the original pools have always been cold water and, originally just a river inlet. The pools and surrounding streets have never seen high visitor numbers. The current proposal will result in very large numbers of people congregating in the street, queuing in and outside of the pools, aswell as the obvious noise related to swimming, leisure and cafe facilities. This is all unprecedented and out of scale with the small, quiet cul-de-sac in which the original pools building sits.

c) Privacy - Several properties directly neighbour the pool and will suffer from a loss of privacy, especially given the high numbers of visitors expected and the very long opening hours required to break even due to the prestige nature of the plans (14 hours per day, 7 days per week).The removal of almost all of the trees surrounding the pool will remove all current screening and further reduce the privacy enjoyed currently. The creation of a cafe, toilet block and other completely new buildings will further reduce the privacy of neighbouring properties as these areas of the Pools are proposed to be in close proximity to neighbouring houses and will be used all day by many people.

d) Smells - The cafe, toilet block and related rubbish storage areas are expected to generate unwelcome odours and are in close proximity to neighbouring houses. At the large scale of use proposed, these could be extremely problematic for residents.

e) Cafe : There has never been a cafe or restaurant at the Pools before. The additional of a cafe, open 98+ hours per week will bring food smells into the surrounding homes. It will also be a small area, densely packed with people making noise in close proximity to residents' houses. Further, it will require dustbins and regular rubbish collections, bringing additional large, polluting vehicles into Hampton Row several times a week.

f) Access : there is one, narrow (1.5m) alleyway remaining that is now the only pedestrian entrance to the pools. This is sandwiched between two residential buildings and runs between the bedroom of one house and the opening window of the bathroom of the other. It is completely inadequate to intensify the usage of the pools to this extent given the lack of adequate access.

Sadly, none of these issues have been addressed by the current planning application or related business plan and the Cleveland Pools Trust have not conducted a local impact assessment. The plans, as they stand, will not therefore achieve the stated aim of the proposal of 'enhancing the quality of life of local communities' they will destroy a unique neighbourhood.

There is no statement of community involvement included in the planning application because there has never been any consultation with the neighbouring community. All of this demonstrates a lack of the understanding of the impact of this proposal, and impact which should be much better understood and considered before planning permission is granted.


2. Loss of historic buildings and features of beauty in favour of intensification to drive profits

This application represents the destruction of the oldest and most historically significant buildings contained within the Cleveland Pools, namely the ladies pool and the childrens' pool. The only pool being preserved was built in 1900 as has no historical significance. The crescent buildings could be preserved and enjoyed as a visitor centre or community centre (or multiple other alternatives, never considered or consulted upon) without the loss of the ladies pool and childrens' pools. It is the major redevelopment of the site into a large-scale leisure complex that has led to a proposal that destroys the oldest and most significant features of the buildings.

The creation of a large toilet block, with a wall facing the river will detract from the beauty of the river and also of the Pools, when viewed from Kensington Meadows. This toilet block, along with a high fence all along the river bank and the removal of all trees will change this strip of river, making it far less green and much more built-up. These plans also separate the Pools from the river, which changes the character of the Pools, originally designed as a place for river swimming and enjoyment of river activities.

This major redevelopment therefore completely belittles the stated strategy of preserving the pools for future generations. This proposal therefore clearly has as its aim the opening of the baths as a large-scale, money making public and tourist leisure destination and disregards the damage it will do to the historic Pools buildings in favour of pursuing money-making aims.

In direct contravention of BANES' own local plan, section BH.13, this development will adversely affect, indeed eradicate some of the essential fabric and the unique character of the pools.

This proposal would more than double the size of the buildings based on internal square footage alone. Once other structures are factored in, including those without a roof or without 4 walls, the increase represents overdevelopment. The addition of these buildings will affect the setting of the historic Pools themselves and also the Grade II listed cottages surrounding the pools.

The intensification of use planned, in order to achieve financial break-even, makes this proposal a completely different animal to anything the Pools has ever been in the past. There is surely no need or precedent for opening a 36k+ visitor leisure complex in a quiet cul-de-sac of Georgian cottages.


3. Traffic generation, road access, parking, loading and highway safety

This application lacks any proper analysis of the serious issues of traffic. As a resident of the Bathwick Estate, I object strongly to the plans and the intensification of the Pools the plans represent on the grounds of an increase in traffic and traffic-related problems and expect to see a full analysis of the effect on traffic, access and safety for local residents.

Context : On previous 'open days' when the pools have been open to the public, an estimated 40-50% of visitors came by car (as stated by the Cleveland Pools Trust). We therefore believe that 40% is a more realistic estimate (rather than the 10% stated in the planning application) of people attempting to visit, or drop off and collect visitors once the pools re-opens. On average, this is at least 100 visitors per day arriving by car. If they are dropped off and collected, that is 200 additional cars per day coming into a quiet, currently traffic free cul-de-sac. On busy, hot days, with (a CPT estimate) 900+ visitors, if 40% of those are dropped off and collected by car, that is 720 additional cars entering the Bathwick Estate per day.

Hampton Row, in which the Pools are located is a cul-de-sac and it is expected that many visitors will attempt to enter the street and turn around at the end near the railway bridge. This will be disastrous and dangerous to children out playing in a very small, narrow street where two cars cannot pass each other.

These numbers would drastically and adversely impact the character of the whole Bathwick estate. In particular, it could destroy the safe, peaceful environment in which the residents and especially the children currently live. The following impacts are unacceptable to the residents :

-Inability of our children to play out safely in the street
-Increased number of cars trying to park/ drop people off and causing dangerous situations where multiple cars are attempting to enter/ back-out/ turn in a restricted space
-Increased air pollution, especially given that cars will be slowing, parking, turning rather than just passing through
- Inability to park our cars or to easily come into and out of the street to get to work or take children to school
- Increasing the major traffic issues already causing problems and tailbacks along the A36/ Beckford ROad/ Bathwick Street to Cleveland Bridge

I have attended several meetings recently that the Cleveland Pools Trust have reluctantly agreed to have with the local residents They have repeatedly refused to address any of the concerns listed above and have instead, told us that these plans are already fixed, they are not interested in our input and have no intention of conducting a local impact assessment. I believe this planning application should be rejected and the Trust made to work with its neighbours and the local community to find acceptable and less harmful options for re-opening the pools. We all want the pools to be saved but alot of public money has already been wasted on what is, sadly, an unworkable plan created in isolation of the community it will most affect.
16/12/2016
Victoria Walters Flat D 7 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 23/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
23/12/2016
Jennie Burgess 7 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Pete Reeve 6 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
James Matthews 5 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Jasper Pattison 2 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 21/12/2016: It's like knocking down Bath Abbey apart from the West Wall.The 1000's of car borne visitors can sit in traffic jams all day worrying if the Font will overflow in stormy seasons. 22/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high summer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
22/12/2016
Gordon Mills 1 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 11/12/2016: 36000 visitors per year and the traffic generated by this will completely change our quiet residential street there has been no proper consultation on this project and furthermore the disruption from the building work has not been clearly thought through. 11/12/2016
Mr Geoffrey Smith 1 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Joan Gee Flat 3 St Thomas More, 3 Market Street, BA15 1LH, S 12/12/2016: Cleveland pool is unique and should definitely be preserved . It will provide a wonderful and beautiful amenity for locals and visitors alike. 12/12/2016
William Girdiefski Flat 3 St Thomas More, 3 Market Street, BA15 1LH, S 13/12/2016: I feel this to be a very worthwhile project. The pool is probably the oldest outdoor swimming pool in England and as such is unique.It wI'll be an asset in Bath. 13/12/2016
Meg 25 Purlewent Drive, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4AZ S 07/01/2017: On completion this will be a beautiful facility to encourage children and adults to exercise and be able to enjoy swimming in a unique setting in the city. 07/01/2017
Gill Brooks 65 Springfield, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1BA, S 28/01/2017: As a volunteer at the Cleveland Pools I fully support this application. The site is of incredible historical & cultural interest. The restoration would add to the number of wide ranging sites already drawing visitors to the city. It will also restore a facility for Bath families to enjoy and the health benefits of outdoor swimming/activity cannot be ignored. I hope the incredible hard work and enthusiasm of the many people involved will be rewarded and look forward to the pools opening in the not too distant future. 28/01/2017
Wayne Hill 2 Lower Farm Cottages, Wilmington Hill, Stanton Prior, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 9HZ S 05/01/2017: Dear Mr Neilson

Please recommend approval of the application by Cleveland Pools. The application's sensitivity to local residents is one of its hallmarks. Equally important, the pools are a vital, driving force in Bath's improved use of the the river, both upstream and downstream of city centre, with all the advantages that this new focus on the river will bring. The consideration of this wider context is in addition to the benefits and enjoyment that I and numerous friends will derive from swimming in the Pools. Beyond even these strong reasons, please approve this application so that a unique element of Bath's and the UK's heritage will be not only saved but incorporated into active, enjoyuable use for residents and visitors.
05/01/2017
Mrs J A Prosser 6 Belmont, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5DZ S View Associated Documents 20/12/2016
Sandra Friend 2 Oriel Gardens, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AS S 16/01/2017: This pool is unique & part of Bath's history utilizing it's waters.
It would be a great pity shame for it to be allowed to deteriorate.
It will also provide a community recreation facility.
16/01/2017
Liz Alvey 12 Millmead Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3JW S 22/12/2016: I support this application. 22/12/2016
Holly Bowman 63 Old Fosse Road, Odd Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2SP S 16/12/2016: I have lived in Bath for 12 years. Formerly in Bath and now in Odd Down and I heartily support the renovation of the Cleveland Pools.

I believe restoring this important part of Bath's heritage is essential for the following reasons:
1) The buildings are beautiful and the setting is enchanting. The pools should be saved from further decay so they can be enjoyed by future generations.
2) The pools augment Bath's reputation as a city with waters at its heart.
3) Providing a reasonably priced open air pool will be a great bonus for young people and will contribute to public health.

I know the pools has a lot of public support and many people are keen to be able to bring their family their to swim again.
16/12/2016
Julian Clementson 121 Westbury Leigh, BA13 3SU S 16/12/2016: This is a fantastic restoration opportunity not to be missed. 16/12/2016
Clifford Williams 111 Langdon Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1LT S 16/12/2016: I feel that a restored outdoor space close to the centre would be great for residents. 16/12/2016
Alice Roberton 221 Bailbrook Lane, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AA S 16/12/2016: This important part of Bath's history needs to be resurrected 16/12/2016
Natalie Barwood 8 Herbert Street, Bristol, BS5 9BL S 16/12/2016: This is a beautiful building, and a facility that will support the health and wellbeing of the community. 16/12/2016
James Donald 27 The Hexagon, Kempthorne Lane, Odd Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5RS S 16/12/2016: Opening of affordable open air swimming facilities at this beautiful facility will be a great addition to Bath 16/12/2016
Emmanuelle Ginn 14 Meadow Park, Bathford, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7PX S 16/12/2016: Can't wait for it all to be done. 16/12/2016
Camille Elesmore-Venet 48 Dumpton Park Road, Ramsgate, Kent, CT117JR S 16/12/2016: Wonderful news.
Outdoor swimming is booming and this project is very welcomed!
16/12/2016
Jamie Middleton 30 Frankley Buildings, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EG S 16/12/2016: I believe this will be a great addition to the city of Bath. Not to mention a great way to rejuvenate an important historical site. 16/12/2016
Tracy Mends 5 Elaine Close , Thornhill , Cardiff , CF14 9AT S 16/12/2016: I support the application 16/12/2016
Sarah Montrose Drayman's Croft, Bicester, OX26 6EA S 16/12/2016: We used to live in Bath and were aware of the potential of this place. We visit frequently and would definitely use the pools if they were developed. Such an important historical place should be restored! 16/12/2016
Jane Wathan Bournes Cottage, High Beech Road, The Pludds, Ruardean, GL17 9UD S 16/12/2016: I fully support this application. 16/12/2016
Lindsay Renwick 115 Bay Tree Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NF S 16/12/2016: This would be a wonderful thing to see restored 16/12/2016
Anne-Katrin Greensmith 34 Kensington Gardens, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6LH S 16/12/2016: I strongly support the application to reopen the Clevedon Pools. I always felt that Bath is lacking a lido and having been to the lido in Street I believe it will be well used. 16/12/2016
Lindsey Huchrak 4 The Paddock, Bradford On Avon, BA15 1FN S 16/12/2016: Bought my kids up using these Pools. To see them restored and breathed life into so we can use them again would be a joy. 16/12/2016
George Davidson Old Down House, Horton, Dorset, BH21 7HL S 16/12/2016: This is a brilliant project and one that must be supported. 16/12/2016
Kate Rew Blencathra, Bakers Lane, BA3 4EW S 16/12/2016: As a keen swimmer and event organiser in the Bath area I fully support this project. I will make use of the pool both personally and as a venue for events (I run a nationwide community called the Outdoor Swimming Society) and think it will bring a great deal to people in the area in terms of health and happiness. 16/12/2016
Genine Rozario 11 Rubens Close, Keynsham, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS31 1NA S 16/12/2016: I use to swim their as a child, 40 years ago. It would be so good to see it restored and used by the community again. 16/12/2016
Celia Trevan 23 Elmgrove Road, BS6 6AJ S 16/12/2016: This would be a great restoration project, taking into account the success of henleaze lake in Bristol 16/12/2016
Rebecca Emmett 63 Keston Road, London , N176PJ S 16/12/2016: Please reopen the baths 16/12/2016
Alex Crawford 17 Cargate Avenue, Aldershot, GU11 3EP S 16/12/2016: I wish to support this application, because, as a councillor in Rushmoor, where I am a member of the Aldershot Lido Group, I am fully aware of the need to restore lidos for the sustainable use of current and future generations. This was publicised yesterday on the Flog It! TV programme - http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b049jmzl/flog-it-series-12-29-oxford-19

Paul Martin of "Flog It!" delved into the world of lost lidos - Can they be saved for future generations? - about 24:00 min into the programme - and lasting for 6 minutes

It was inspiring about making lidos sustainable for current and future generations.
16/12/2016
Laine 6 Solsbury Way, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6HH S 16/12/2016: This is a lovely place thst should be shared & supported. 16/12/2016
Kevin And Michele Wright 7 Fullarton Courtyard, KA10 7HF S 16/12/2016: We discovered you area a couple of years ago when my husband worked there. We love the outdoor swimming round and about so much we have returned to holiday twice. We have swum with the river swimming club, and know there are many lovers of outdoor swimming who travel big distances to enjoy their hobby. We have also holidayed at Woodhall Spa in Lincolnshire as they have a wonderfully run lido - which is very well used. Your lido will benefit locals and tourists alike. A wonderful asset to a lovely area 16/12/2016
Fleur Hitchcock 79 Murhill, BA2 7FB S 16/12/2016: A long time resident of Bath and of the area, I wholeheartedly approve of this application. It would be a badly needed service restored. A wonderful asset to the city and good for the health and mental health of lots of people. The application looks sensitive and well thought out. 16/12/2016
Nick Kearney Redhill House, Red Hill, Camerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 0NY S 16/12/2016: This is an important part fo the history of Bath and a valuable amenity, especially given that there are few open air swimming facilities locally, and a growing number of people who participate in this activity all year round. I strongly support the project. 16/12/2016
Emma Pusill 62 South Road, Portishead, Bristol, BS20 7DX S 16/12/2016: I cannot endorse this application strongly enough. Cleveland Pools are unique in the UK, as you will know I'm sure. That heritage must be not only preserved but also brought back to life as part of the city's health and wellbeing strategy. Swimming outdoors is one of life's simplest pleasures, and providing a safe place to do that is very important. It is also clear that a forward thinking local authority can, and should, see lidos as an important part of their economic development. The recently refurbished lido in Pontypridd has been so successful at bringing income into the town that the local authority opted to keep it free to use in 2016. Although Cleveland Pools will not be under the control of the authority the entire city can, and will, benefit from the visitors it will bring.

I had the great pleasure to visit the pools during one of the Heritage Open Days, and the commitment of the volunteers was plain to see. That brings social cohesion benefits to a town as well, through the volunteering itself. I can also say that during my visit to Bath for that open day I spent in the region of £75 by the time I had paid for parking, done a little shopping and had some lunch. That is important ancillary spend that I hope the local authority will recognise when it considers the merits of this application.
16/12/2016
Liz Young 46 Springfield Crest, BA15 1BB S 16/12/2016: It would be wonderful if these baths were open to all again. There aren't any lidos for miles around here and in such a beautiful setting. 16/12/2016
Rebecca Edwards 3 Broomfield, London , E17 8DZ S 16/12/2016: This would be absolutely fantastic. 16/12/2016
J Wellingham 2 Post Office Row , Little Compton , Moreton-in-Marsh , Gloucestershire , GL56 0RZ S 16/12/2016: I support the restoration of historic sites that also provide recreation facilities for today that encourages a healthy lifestyle like swimming. 16/12/2016
Michael Allen Ty Newydd , School Lane, Overton , LL13 0ES S 16/12/2016: This facility would definitely encourage me to visit your area as a tourist and tell my network about it. 16/12/2016
Lindsey Orr 48 Wells Road, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3AP S 16/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support this project. Indoor swimming may be in decline, but outdoor swimming is a huge growth area. We're all indoors doing too much on tech, we need outdoor spaces and time in nature. Bath is a Spa town, so an outdoor swimming facility (heated) is a great fit. And will be hugely popular, both for locals and city visitors. It's a beautiful space, lovely architecture and a real shame it's been let to go unused for so long. Clevedon on the Bristol coast have do a big restoration project on their marine lake, and it means I now travel over to Clevedon regularly to swim and then eat and shop in the area. Bringing wealth to that community. People will do the same for the Clevedon Pools in Bath. I hope it will be restored and open year round. Supporting the health and wealth of Bath and it's many visitors. Let's make Bath the best spa break destination city. And soon :-) 16/12/2016
Cath Potter 6 Freeman Avenue, Ashton Under Lyne , OL66PX S 16/12/2016: This would be a great visitor attraction. 16/12/2016
Daniel Grabham 18 Leigh Close, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6LB S 16/12/2016: I think this would be a fantastic benefit for the local area and that it should be supported unreservedly. 16/12/2016
Alice Tomlinson 7 Eden Apartments, 3 Glengarnock Avenue, E14 3ER S 16/12/2016: I support the re-opening of Cleveland Baths 16/12/2016
Helen Sudell 11 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before 1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in highsummer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.

23/12/2016: I am very concerned about the proposed amount of people travelling to visit the pools. No mention is made of the fact that people will be able to park on the estate from 6 to 9pm 7 days a week, making it impossible for residents to park themselves. It is a very quiet estate that will be altered forever by over 30,000 visitors within a 6-month period. Coupled with this is the frequent amount of coaches and delivery vehicles that will have to negotiate our narrow streets. If this planning application goes ahead we will lose the peace and quiet that we currently enjoy for ever. 23/12/2016
Emme Sinden 30 Lower Oldfield Park, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3HP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before 1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in highsummer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.

16/12/2016
Spencer Sinden 30 Lower Oldfield Park, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3HP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before 1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in highsummer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.

16/12/2016
Anthea Kemp Edgecombe House, Great Elm, Frome, BA11 3NY O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before 1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in highsummer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.

16/12/2016
John Harvey 25 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ric Jerrom 5 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before 1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in highsummer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.

28/12/2016: It’s hard to know where to begin with one’s objections to the planning application put forward by the Cleveland Pools Trust: councillors and council officers will already be aware of the years-long and completely futile struggle of local residents to persuade the (self-appointed) Trust to discuss with us the future of the Pools. They will be aware of residents’ concerns about noise, traffic, pollution, encroachment and the progressive destruction of neighbourhood. These are not small matters: they are the warp and weft of democracy. The area around the Cleveland Pools is a happy place; these plans, if approved, cannot fail to make it unhappy.

The Cleveland Pools are small and secluded – almost secret. Sunny afternoons back in the early 80’s transformed them joyfully and briefly into a jolly and rumbustious water–playground for children and families, which closed at teatime. Numbers of people remember those days and miss the Pools as they were. Me too – I lived here then as I still do now. It is important to note that most of the “support” posted on the Bath&NES Planning website is either justifiable nostalgia for a charming, safe, secluded and uncrowded children’s pool-and-play area – or it is the even more justifiable desire on the part of many people (again, I include myself)for a proper “Lido” such as a World-renowned spa city really ought to have – with regular outdoor swimming year-round for the many residents who want it and for spa-loving visitors hoping for a “full spa experience” – with children’s facilities properly and professionally run alongside.
It’s quite clear that most of the “supporters” of the submitted plans haven’t read them through. The Trust’s plans are not for a Lido. They are for heated-pool swimming for only 5 Summer months – not year-round. The focus is very much on adults, not on children. And let’s be clear about this: these plans do not and cannot make the site larger or less steep than it is, nor the remaining pool serve hundreds of swimmers at the same time.

As to the “heritage” aspects of the Pools: I hope that our councilors and officers are aware too of the destruction or permanent concealment of historic features necessary to the fulfillment of these plans, together with the erection of unsympathetic and inappropriate prefabricated units. I have corresponded with various of the “Heritage” organizations who have “supported” the plans, and am very saddened to note that the overwhelming reason for their (mostly underwhelming) support is their real fear that this ill thought-out scheme is the only chance to save, in any form at all, this lovely historic and valuable place – successive Councils having turned their backs on it.
I will not repeat nor rehearse any more of the large number of highly valid objections there are to this sorry scheme: but to “nod it through” because this is the “only chance” to “save” the Pools? Shameful! Let’s – while we’re at it – put flumes and “Dunkin’ Donuts” in the Roman Baths!

We should be positive. Cleveland Pools is an historic small cold-water pool: let’s conserve it – not “develop” it! There are many ways this can be done, tastefully and inexpensively.
What this planning exercise tells all of us, excitingly, is that there is a real desire, a need, for a proper Lido in Bath. Cleveland Pools cannot be that Lido: too small, inaccessible, just wrong.
Where should the New Bath Lido be? Now that will be a really brilliant discussion – and not one for a self-elected “Trust”, but city-wide! I suggest using the overflow of the 100,000 daily litres of hot springs water, unique to Bath, which flows under Parade Gardens and wastefully into the Avon, to transform Parade Gardens into a Lido and Water-Park.

The Cleveland Pools Trust’s plans speak much of “heritage”. I think “sacrilege” is more like it: commercial vandalism. The Pools are to be “monetized” at the expense – the actual loss - of their history, their charm and atmosphere, their potential usefulness – and the peace and pleasance of an entire neighbourhood.
There are, of course genuine alternatives.
Please, Planning Officers and Councillors, prevent this planned unpleasantness. Let’s plan properly – inclusively, practically – and save Cleveland Pools for Posterity: not pillage them for profit.
28/12/2016
Christine Kneale 10 Farlington Avenue , Portsmouth, PO6 1DG S 16/12/2016: This looks wonderful and I would take a trip to visit it 16/12/2016
Colette Foulstone Rosemont Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 16/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Louisa Pitt 8 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Freddy Pitt 8 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Rachel Gibson 71 Symington Road, Bristol, BS16 2IN S 16/12/2016: This project would improve the health and integration of the community. 16/12/2016
Jude Sandy 5 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
27/12/2016: I am objecting to the ‘restoration’ plans put forward by the Cleveland Pools Trust

I am certainly not against the restoration of Cleveland Pools and let’s not get carried away, as many people have, with the idea that the Cleveland Pools are a Lido – the Pools were never a Lido. They have always been cold-water pools and should remain cold-water pools if this is to be a ‘heritage’ restoration.

My primary objection is to the inflated size of the proposed scheme. There is no proper access to the site by road and this problem has not been satisfactorily addressed by the Cleveland Pools Trust. This scheme is just too big for the site. Bath Boating Station is the only other commercial enterprise on the Bathwick Estate – it has access and parking – which the Pools don’t have. They manage to run their business in harmony with the local community. It can be very noisy on the river at times, but we know that the boats do not start until 9.30 and will always be finished by 6 pm. The Cleveland Pools Trust plan to open from 7 am until 9 pm every day for 5 months of the year – this will seriously harm the quality of life of local residents.

The ‘green plan’ put forward by the Trust appears to be an exercise in putting everything green that could be thought of on a flip-chart and then submitting the list as a plan.

1. Ask people not to come by car – this has not worked on Open Days – and certainly on Sundays it has required 2 parking attendants to manage the traffic as there are no restrictions on parking. We have observed that people are dropped off at the junction of Beckford Road and Rockcliffe Avenue on Open Days – this will only increase if people are carrying swimming kit
2. Encourage people to cycle – with no thought as to where they will park their bikes – Hampton Row is a narrow residential cul-de-sac
3. Run a mini-bus – dropping off at the junction - Bathwick Estate is a quiet residential area


Of the many options for preserving the Cleveland Pools, the Trust have selected one that destroys the most historic features, is out of all proportion with anything it has been before and will have a hugely negative impact on the neighbouring community as well as the physical environs - the plans include the removal of 27 of the 36 mature trees, and pollarding the remainder, and the building of a massive toilet/shower block on the river bank. Although the Trust have carried out impact assessments on bats, slow-worms and pondweed no thought has been given to the ‘ordinary’ wildlife – foxes, squirrels, badgers, water voles, otters, lizards, toads, newts to name but a few – as for the birdlife – woodpeckers; green and spotted, long tail tits, green finches, gold finches, bull finches, great tits, blue tits, blackbirds, thrushes, robins, and wood pigeons are just a few of the birds that can be seen in Hampton Row. The loss of habitat by the removal of trees will have a serious impact on the wildlife in the area.

However, by far the greatest oversight is the local community – The negative impact on the local community has not been considered at any stage in the planning of this scheme. This is exemplified perfectly by the off the cuff suggestion that the neighbouring Hampton Row allotments – created by the Council for the benefit of local people - be annexed for use as a building plot and car park. The local community has been treated throughout this process as mere collateral damage.


Even people desperate to see the pools open are asking for serious revision of this proposal. I personally would love to go swimming at the Cleveland Pools but not at such a cost to the local community and environment

Please don’t allow this insensitive and grandiose plan destroy the atmosphere and beauty of the Cleveland Pools and the lives of ordinary people in this unique, peaceful and beautiful area of our lovely city
27/12/2016
Will Farrar 2 Upper Golf Links Road , BH18 8BU S 16/12/2016: Great idea. Restoring a good bit of Bath / British heritage, bringing community together and encouraging people of all ages to be active in the outdoors.. Looking forwards to having a dip once complete! 16/12/2016
Tanith Capitani 1 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Pam Bennett 39 Osborne Road, New Milton, BH25 6AF S View Associated Documents 16/12/2016
John Ord 37 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Sophie Piddock 30 Maynard Terrace, Clutton, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS39 5PW S 16/12/2016: This would be an asset to the whole of the south west not just Bath a fantastic facility for the city to have which will be used by many. We all want to encourage healthy outdoor activities, this is one of them. 16/12/2016
Sara 12 Braithwaite Court , Colnhurst Road , Watford , WD17 4BZ S 16/12/2016: Everyone has the right to access nature and free outdoor swimming. It benefits your health, the community and has positive social benefits. What a beautiful place to be concerved. 16/12/2016
Marian Harvey 25 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Jennifer Harvey 25 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Liz Jones 14 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Tom Hey 19 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Olivia Russell Road, London, W14 8HW S 16/12/2016: Support 16/12/2016
Dr Natasha Alden Flat 4, 40 James St, Oxford, OX4 1ET S 16/12/2016: I'm writing, as a former resident of Bath for 20 years, to support this application. The pools are a wonderful resource for the city which will bring in a lot of extra tourist trade, as well as being an important part of the heritage of the city. It would be very easy to link these baths in to the Roman and new baths and to then have them as an educational, cultural and leisure resource.

I moved to Bath in 1989 and have seen the city change hugely since then, as we reclaimed and repaired so much of the heritage which had been a bit neglected. This must be the only place left in Bath which I can think of which badly needs maintenance and opening up! I'd certainly come back to Bath to swim there and I know many other people who would travel (a long way!) to us these pools.
16/12/2016
Caroline Hey 19 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ronald Haslett 21 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Richard Cooper 9 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
19/12/2016: The plans as submitted show clearly a strong case of 'mission creep'
Far from just restoring the pools as they were when last in use, it's clear that a major
commercial enterprise is hoped for.
Such a scheme would inevitably change hugely the nature of this corner of Bath with
the extra traffic, noise etc.
As I see it , the historic fabric will be largely destroyed, and with the building of a toilet
block on the river bank, the crescent will be partially hidden from the opposite bank.
I note that the majority of those supporting the application are not immediate neighbors
and possibly have fond memories (as I do incidentally) of how it was and imagine a return to that. Alas, it won't happen if this scheme goes ahead as declared.
19/12/2016
Cecily Robinson 7 Larkhall Place, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SF O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Mr Deear 6 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Miss Jessica Smith 1 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Dianne Brabham 19 Boldmere Gardens, Sutton, B73 5IN S 16/12/2016: I definitely support the application. Although not from the area I visit frequently and this would be a definite draw to tourists. I and many other swimmers would come specifically to swim here. 16/12/2016
A L Blaze Rose Cottage, Cleveland Row, Bath, BA2 6QR O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Faye Page 1 Belmont Road, Brislington, BS4 3PB S 16/12/2016: Fully in support of this. Outdoor swimming is growing in popularity and it will undoubtedly help with the physical and mental health of its visitors. 16/12/2016
D Henderson 41 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ruth Walcot 37 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
20/12/2016: I would very much like to be able to support the application for Cleveland Pools restoration, however I feel the current plans have too many serious flaws for me to give them my support. My main objections are as follows:

The opening hours are too long for such a closed residential area. I have two small children and all of our bedrooms are to the back of the property and I feel it is unreasonable to have such late and early opening in a residential area for an open air site. The sounds travels upwards from the site with little attenuation, and cutting down the surrounding trees will only exacerbate this issue. Previous events at the pools have caused significant sound pollution.

The opening hours will also lead to increased traffic passing through the residential streets where children currently play in safety. An increased footfall of strangers will definitely change the way in which we all live as I would be less happy to let my children play outside unsupervised when it is no longer just a community area. In a world where children are increasingly kept indoors for safety this is one of a few remaining areas where children do ride their bikes around the streets and the neighbours keep an eye on them. I fear this will be lost and fundamentally change our neighbourhood. The benefits from the open air pool do not offset this for me personally.

My largest concern is with the complete lack of travel plan. Previous Heritage days have demonstrated that despite all urgings people will travel by car. The streets currently provide sufficient parking for residents and occasional visitors. Any event, even a residents birthday party with travelling guests or a Cleveland pool volunteers meeting, can cause an overload to this balance. A leisure complex that is aiming to attract £36k visitors annually to the local area will have a huge and unarguable effect on the local streets. There is no provision for bicycle parking in these plans so any plans that people may travel by bike cannot currently be supported. I lived near an unheated open air lido in Cambridge which had pedestrian only access and the bike park outside was huge and always full. There is no space for this and it is not in current plans.
It seems to me this travel aspect has not been given any detail in the plans as it is just too difficult a problem for them to find a solution for and thus they have ignored it.

My final concern is with access to the site for building works. I am currently completing a modest building project a few doors away and have had some big problems with access and its impact on my neighbours. It is naïve to think the builders will address this issue as it falls outside of their responsibility and they have no vested interest in keeping good relations with neighbours. Without a detailed idea of how these plans can be completed without destroying the neighbourhood from a social and environmental viewpoint I cannot support them.

My objections above largely stem from the scale of the plans for the pools. I would genuinely love an open air pool for bath, and one so local to me, the problems stem from the fact that the Pools Trust have to make such a large business from this in order to get their funding to save the site. I feel that more limited opening hours, no requirement for additional income from private events that are unrelated to the pools function or restoration and a really well thought through travel plan are required before I could give this my support. I really hope that this is possible and that the local and wider community get a facility we can all enjoy.
20/12/2016
Theodor Adde 24 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Emmeline Buckley 308 Highbury, New Park , N52LG S 16/12/2016: It's such a shame that the swimming pool was ever allowed to fall into disrepair. Bath will hugely benefit from such a facility being available to the public. Moreover, access a pool like this will align with Bath Council's wider public health priorities - e.g. obesity preventions strategies.

I support the application.
16/12/2016
Jackson Risby 24 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Julia Warin 3 Greenland View, BA15 1JL S 16/12/2016: I can see no good reason not to give permission to restore this swimming pool. What a fantastic addition to Bath it would be. Good for locals and for tourism too. 16/12/2016
Steve Sherlock 30 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Celia Price 20 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Jodie Kelly 20 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Hamish Scott-Preston 20 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Bonnie Radcliffe 4 Corner Green, SE3 9JJ S 16/12/2016: This is a wonderful facility that would be a great asset to the area. 16/12/2016
Jack Davies 18 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Nick Howdie 6 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Steve Gallagher 2 Mayfield Mews, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3FD, S 16/12/2016: This would be a brilliant valuable asset for the city 16/12/2016
Sarah Bourns 45 Keynsham Street, Cheltenham, GL52 6EN S 16/12/2016: Experience of successful re-opening of Cheltenham lido supports health and wellbeing in the local community, also source of income/ employment to locals. 16/12/2016
William Buckley 63 Pembury Close, E5 8JP S 16/12/2016: This would be a massive asset to the area for all ages in the community. 16/12/2016
Georgia Attlesey 4 Lambridge Place, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6RU S 16/12/2016: I strongly support this application. 16/12/2016
Sally Wood 21 Albert Promenade, Loughborough, Leics, LE11 1RB S 16/12/2016: Please support restoration of this lovely lido. outdoor swimming becoming vey popular with proven health benefits 16/12/2016
Katherine Slater Flat 3 Northfield House, Richmond Road, Beacon Hill, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5PR S 16/12/2016: How amazing would this be for people's health and to love their community. 16/12/2016
Annette Daly 36 Glendower Road, Pl3 4LA S 16/12/2016: Swimming outdoors in enjoying a huge revival in the UK as well as abroad. This applications e epresents a chance to save a another of the UK's great pools for the enjoyment of future generations. Swimming also has fantastic public health benefits and can be enjoyed by all ages and abilities so is a good use of public funds. 16/12/2016
Helen Coombes 9 Hopewell Road, Matlock, Derbyshire, DE4 3JN S 16/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support the proposal to restore this important and historic outdoor swimming facility for the people of and visitors to Bath. 16/12/2016
Tanya Nelson Ashclyst House , Whimple , Exeter , EX5 2NU S 16/12/2016: Would be a benefit to the community to see this restored 16/12/2016
Robert Cheetham 1 Botely House, East Street, Chesham, Bucks, 1DG HP5 S 16/12/2016: The open air baths are a fantastic resource and should be restored and opened as soon as possible. 16/12/2016
Julie Lewis 46 Faulkland View, Peasedown St. John, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 8TG S 16/12/2016: I support this application 16/12/2016
Glens Daniels 24 Masons Way, SN13 9XP S 16/12/2016: This is a wonderful project which aims to restore the Cleveland Pools to their former glory for the benefit of future generations. A great addition to the facilities that Bath has to offer to residents and visitors. 16/12/2016
Zoe Alexander Flat 1, 3 Argyle Street, BA1 4BA S 16/12/2016: Supporting Cleveland pools! 16/12/2016
Patrick Connolly 39 St John's Road, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6PZ, S 16/12/2016: I support this application as fully restored and operating pool would provide a historic amenity to the city. 16/12/2016
Andrea Lakin 4 Maple Road, Poole , BH15 2NA O 16/12/2016: Baths like these are so few and must be protected for reasons of cultural heritage in addition to health, leisure and recreation 16/12/2016
Irena Cole The Limes, Pewsham House, Chippenham , SN15 3RX S 16/12/2016: This is a great project for many reasons- historical, social, cultural as well as for individuals' well-being & I can't wait to swim there! 16/12/2016
Neil Whitehead 12 The Batch, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7DR S 16/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support this planning application. A restored Cleveland Pools will be a huge asset to our city - for both tourists and locals. A project such as this, focusing on heritage and well-being, can only be a good thing. We must take this chance now and restore the Cleveland Pools to its former glory before it's too late. 16/12/2016
Debbie Spearman 47 Muller Road, Bristol, BS7 9RH S 16/12/2016: What an exciting project. I hope to be swimming there in the near future! 16/12/2016
Lucy Loran 5 Willow Falls, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7DG S 16/12/2016: The facilities in Bath seem to all be directed towards tourists. This pool would be a wonderful chance to make Bath a better place for residents 16/12/2016
Michael Harris 3 Rhymes Place, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AG, S 16/12/2016: The restoration of the Pools will not only preserve a valuable heritage site but it wall also provide a valuable community asset. 16/12/2016
Mrs H Thompson The Fosse, Fosse Lane, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7NL S 16/12/2016: This is a wonderful project for Bath people and tourists alike. 16/12/2016
Susan Northcott 24 Curzon Road , Poole, Dorset, BH14 8BE S 16/12/2016: As an open-air, all year round swimmer of 70 I fully support this application. Nothing can compare with the 3-dimensional aspect of open-air compared to indoor swimming.
Also this lido appears to be iconic in both build and age, please save it as outdoor swimming is enjoying a resurgence in popularity amongst younger people who are aware of the health benefits and other Lidos around the country have been supported and saved and have since proved their popularity.
16/12/2016
Wendy Matthews 5 Beckford Gardens, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QU O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Simon Jones 14 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ben Ludvigsen 50 Forester Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QF O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Anna Mackie 10 Silman Close, Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 0RG S 16/12/2016: It's brilliant that the pool can be brought back to life, so it should be and maintained to high standard but with good accessibility for all. This restoration should have happened years ago, I am glad to get behind it now. 16/12/2016
Peter Norman 5 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ruth Norman 5 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Arthur Foulstone Rosemont Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Pauline Mungai 39 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Carole Beattie 3 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
20/12/2016: This is indeed a beautiful and historically important site and I would be wholly in favour of the pools being sympathetically preserved and restored. This plan seeks to change, move or demolish much that is left of the historic structures. Also to cut down or seriously reduce many mature trees. The proposed new-build toilet block on the river bank deserves a special mention - an eyesore viewed from the opposite bank of this beautiful stretch of river and surely a hazard in terms of inevitable floods.
If the anticipated visitor numbers are achieved there will be chaos in terms of traffic - it is naïve to imagine everyone will leave their cars at home when asked to, plenty didn't on the Open Days, resulting in increased noise and pollution and danger to children who are used to feeling safe in this street.This is a narrow cul de sac, even large numbers of bicycles have no space to be safely left. The site was never intended for such intensive use, nor for a commercial venture with money-raising "events" in a quiet residential area.
Please do not allow this to happen. The pools can be saved in better ways.
20/12/2016
Carl Mungai 1 Fox Cottages, Church Lane, Monkton Combe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7EX O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Mike Grigg 17 Grosvenor Bridge Road, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6BB S 13/12/2016: I support this application and the accompanying Listed Buiding Application for the following reasons:
1. The historical significance to the City in the realm of public, open air bathing and its contribution within the World Heritage Site.
2. The positive addition of a lido facility for all Bath and surrounding area residents.
3. To recognise the work carried out by the Cleveland Pools Trust and, subsequently, by its consultants over years of patient and diligent adherence to the task despite difficulties of funding and the many technical issues.
I would also like to make a further comment on the 'Travel Plan', part of the application documents:
In 1994 the London Area Resident's Association, in response to an 'Ideas for Bath' scheme, made the suggestion of a pedestrian footbridge to link the public footpath beside Cleveland Pools with Kensington Meadows on the opposite bank of the River Avon. The wider view of the proposal was to promote a cycle route along the southern edge of Kensington Meadows, crossing the river and linking with the canal towpath and other cycle routes into Bath. Other advantages of the footbridge would be to make a link with the Bathwick estate, enabling direct shopping access to London Road, avoiding the need for journeys with vehicles.
13/12/2016
Colette Foulstone Rosemont Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 13/12/2016: My main objection is to the business plan. The CPT need to attract too many people and need to make the opening hours unreasonably long (96 hours per week, open 7 days a week, 14 hours a day) to make the business plan work. There are many other possibilities that have not been considered for restoring the site . The CPT has chosen an option that will damage our neighbourhood and community considerably, the CPT have done impact assessments on bats, fish, sloe worms etc. but they have not taken the humans into consideration.

I understand Sydney Gardens are also applying for Heritage Lottery Funding, they will not give to both, would it not be sensible to join forces and make a historical trail, (the two sites are connected by the reinstated canal), restore the listed crescent around the pools and allow people to see the beautiful setting and how the pools used to be (without doubling the number of buildings on site), it could be open to the general public to sit by the river, bring a picnic etc. This would enhance the natural surroundings which are so closely connected to the river, it would also protect the existing wild life. There are many more options that would suit the site more, I don't understand why the CPT feel it necessary to continue with this unrealistic and unachievable commercial business in a tiny, quiet, dead end street where we feel children are safe to play, this potential project is not being received well locally.

There are only 2 roads that lead into the Bathwick Estate. I understand the CPT need on average 1800 customers per week in the summer to make the business plan work. In our last meeting they said they expected 20% of customers to come by car even though there is no parking. The CPT also said their insurance company said they could have a max of 240 customers on site at one time so on a busy hot day they could potentially have 1600 customers in one day (336 car drop-offs and then another 336 pick-ups). If you see our tiny street you would agree this is ridiculous.

The Cleveland Pools Hampton Row entrance is about 5 feet wide. The CPT say they need spaces for disabled buggies as they cannot keep them on site, spaces for motorbikes and scooters, spaces for a bike rack, spaces for deliveries to the profit making cafe, spaces for rubbish collection from the cafe, spaces for recycling from the cafe, and I believe it is obligatory to have designated disabled parking spaces. This will take up a large proportion of our street making parking impossible. The derelict housing at the bottom of the street are also being renovated making 10 new dwellings (possibly another 20 vehicles). If however everyone on this hot day turned up by bicycle where do customers park their 1600 bicycles?

There will be a knock on effect from this ill conceived development throughout the Bathwick Estate robbing us of many things we enjoy as part of living here.

Historically as a swimming pool the cleveland pools has always failed to break even. Why they think it will work this time, I don't know! The CPT are wanting to more than double the amount of buildings on the existing site to fit in with their business plan rather than restore the existing buildings sympathetically, the CPT are destroying the old children's pool to house the plant for the main pool, the CPT want to cover over the ladies pool, the CPT want to build a new, large toilet block on the river bank, which is wrong on a number of levels. I do not call this a restoration project, more a completely over the top redevelopment of a sensitive site.

I am requesting a site visit from the planning officer please.

13/12/2016
Jonathan Day 21 Victoria Terrace, Westmoreland, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3QZ S 13/12/2016: . 13/12/2016
Saskia Heijltjes 23 Ringswell Gardens, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6BN S 13/12/2016: I can't wait to see and use the open-air swimming pool 13/12/2016
George Mcdonald 4 Maybrick Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3PT R 13/12/2016: This is massively important for Bath 13/12/2016
Steve Gibson 20 Broadmoor Park, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4JW S 13/12/2016: What a brilliant scheme, the sooner it's finished the better - we need this in Bath and what a tourist attraction it could be. 13/12/2016
Grace Horton Buchanan House, 4 Richmond Road, Beacon Hill, Bath, BA1 5TU, S 13/12/2016: An amazing facility with a bit of history. Would be great to restore it and open to the community. 13/12/2016
Sean Quearney 10 Kensington Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6AW S 13/12/2016: I think it's a great idea! It can only make an already beautiful city a lot more nicer. 13/12/2016
Louise Betts 29 Denmark Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3RE S 13/12/2016: I support this application as it would be fantastic to have somewhere in the city to swim outdoors. 13/12/2016
Tracey Gore 1 Claremont Buildings, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EZ S 13/12/2016: Bath is a heritage city and these Baths are part of that they need to be kept as they were. 13/12/2016
Jackie Hunt 2 Sedgemoor Terrace, Sedgemoor Road, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5RA R 13/12/2016: Had a lot of fun there as a child, my children missed out. Would love my grandchildren to have a chance of enjoying time there 13/12/2016
Tim Calvert-Jones Tolley Cottage, 23 Sydney Buildings, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BZ, S 13/12/2016: I support the proposal. 13/12/2016
Tracey Madden Apt 4 First Floor , 5 Cleveland Place West, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5DG S 13/12/2016: I support this application 13/12/2016
Jo Atack Grove Cottage, 44 Kington St Michael, Chippenham, SN14 6JL, S 13/12/2016: Really important to preserve such a wonderful swimming baths.
In full support.
13/12/2016
Emma Parkinson Second Floor , 14 Rivers Street, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2PZ S 13/12/2016: This would be a wonderful asset to the city of Bath; a community project that will benefit both locals and the tourist economy alike. 13/12/2016
Jess McKenzie 27 Faulkland Road, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3LS S 13/12/2016: I support the Cleveland pools plans 13/12/2016
Robert Iles 56 Sydney Buildings, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6DB S 13/12/2016: I support this application as it will
- repair an important Georgian structure which is currently at risk
- revitalise a valuable community asset that was always considered a popular recreational facility up to the time that it was last used
- will encourage young people to learn to swim
13/12/2016
D Prior 22 Beaconsfield Way , Frome , BA11 2UA , S 13/12/2016: I had many of happy times & we should bring back fun to children life's. good memories 13/12/2016
Natasha Zurick 23 Penn Lea Road, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3RF S 13/12/2016: Important to preserve this important bit of history for the future 13/12/2016
David Phillips 30 Greenacres, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4NS S 13/12/2016: This is a fantastic project! 13/12/2016
Simon Thomas 1 Arundel Road, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EF S 13/12/2016: This will be great for bath. 13/12/2016
Trudi Mayo 21 Weatherly Avenue, Bloomfield, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2PF S 13/12/2016: I support this application because it would be amazing to have an outdoor pool in Bath again for the public to enjoy. 13/12/2016
Julia Guymer 3 Bennett's Road, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AW R 13/12/2016: Many hours of fun at this pool in the 1980s. Need to bring it back for many more generations to enjoy. 13/12/2016
Louise Daniels East Lodge, 8 Bathford Hill, Bathford, Bath, BA1 7SL, S 13/12/2016: Fully support submission 13/12/2016
Dave Atkinson 51 Frome Road, Odd Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2QF S 13/12/2016: I think it's fantastic that this listed facility is being put forward for renovation and re-opening and I can't wait to see it restored and modernised. 13/12/2016
Mark Ilott 80 Radstock Road, Midsomer Norton, Radstock, Bath And North East Somerset, BA3 2AR S 13/12/2016: A facility used by many during my childhood should be preserved and reused for generations to come 13/12/2016
Melanie Gallop 1 Limerick Road , Bristol , BS6 7DX , S 13/12/2016: A good amenity to bring back into public use 13/12/2016
Emma Clements 69 Coronation Avenue, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2JU S 13/12/2016: I am fully happy to support the application. 13/12/2016
Anya Chambers 10 St Christopher's Close, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6RG S 13/12/2016: This project is well overdue and will make a huge difference to the local area. 13/12/2016
Cheryl Thomas 3 Devonshire Mews, Devonshire Buildings, Bear Flat, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4SS S 13/12/2016: This will be an excellent attraction for redidents and visitors 13/12/2016
Graham Kehily 109 Church Street , Hilperton , Wiltshire , BA14 7RG, S 13/12/2016: This is a rare asset which will enhance the city greatly. 13/12/2016
Ms Nicky Horstmann 4 Hill View, High Street, Priston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 9EE S 13/12/2016: Restoring Cleveland Baths will provide a valuable resource for both visitors and residents alike. I look forward to being able to take my children there. 13/12/2016
Sally Winter 105 Broadmoor Lane, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4LH S 13/12/2016: Really looking forward to Cleveland Pool opening again. It will be a wonderful asset to Bath residents and visitors. 13/12/2016
Suzannah Kinsella 23 Common View , Rusthall , Tunbridge Wells , Kent, TN4 8RG, S 13/12/2016: A rare gem that should be restored. 13/12/2016
B Williams-Ellis Old Orchard, 88A Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD, S 28/12/2016: 1Very valuable as a local community asset-public space for families -alternative to limited park space. Learning to swim important-access,generally, to public pools is shrinking.
2 Historically/ architecturally crucial to rescue[ and use if to save], this extraordinary early survival of swimming pool. Important part of Bath's architectural and social history which draws so many people to the city. Can't afford to lose it by not using it.
suggestion- that clever tree+ hedge planting between pool and domestic properties above would radically cut down any noise and activity nuisance that could be perceived to be an issue.
28/12/2016
Louise Jones 2 Trimnells, Colerne, Wiltshire, SN14 8EP S 15/12/2016: I fully support the restoration of the Cleveland Bath 15/12/2016
Dan Hazell 27 Northampton Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2SW R 15/12/2016: Summary: Insufficient consideration of cyclists

I am delighted to see progress on the Cleveland Pools redevelopment, however I am dismayed at the lack of provision for visits by cyclists. Despite BANES strategy to increase pedal power around the city, and the application Travel Plan repeatedly stating that they will encourage visits by bike, the current application does nothing to underpin this claim, and pushes the cyclist challenge onto other bodies.

Specifically:
- There is no inclusion of secure and managed, or at least observed, cycle racking within the site. Off site racks, if ever provided, will get clogged up with abandoned cycles. The current plan discourages visits by bike and could generate concern over the security of bicycles while using the facility.
- Inclusion of modern card or token operated racks should be a default choice for a facility which is promoting health and fitness, and would be a statement of green credentials.
- While there are aspirations for tourism and users from far afield, another segment of users could be traithlon swimmers of all abilities, as can be seen at the London lidos. This group could be particularly useful if the pool is looking to stay open at the fringes of the season. Providing secure cycle storage would also encourage use of the facility by this group as they could 'transition' onto bikes after a swim.

I am hopeful the designs can be improved to make visiting the pools by bike a pleasurable experience, once the cyclist arrives.

Yours sincerely,

Dan Hazell
15/12/2016
Melissa Temple Smith 2 Dunsford Place, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6HF S 15/12/2016: A restored Cleveland Pool will be a fantastic asset both for the local community, and tourists who are attracted to Bath for it's Georgian architecture. 15/12/2016
Alison Wigg 71 Kenilworth Road, GU51 3AY S 15/12/2016: It's so important for both the local and wider community that this pool is revived and restored. I fully support the application. 15/12/2016
Elise Menghini 2 Worcester Terrace, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6PY S 15/12/2016: I'm really looking forward to watching this site grow and flourish! With river boats, bikes or walking routes being the main way to get the pool, fitness will be encouraged. I feel that the Cleveland pools will make another stunning addition of our already beautiful heritage city of Bath. 15/12/2016
Ella Richmond 114 Bath Road, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1SS S 15/12/2016: Would be so great to restore the fabulous open air pool. Just what Bath needs. 15/12/2016
Chris George Garden Flat , 29 Marlborough Buildings, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2LY S 15/12/2016: Pleas support the regeneration of the lido 15/12/2016
Helen Rugg 3 Entry Rise, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5LR S 15/12/2016: Such a big part of Bath childhood so fondly remembered 15/12/2016
Kerry Curtis 5 Nelson Place West, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2BA S 15/12/2016: This is a great project and seems so important to ensure this happens for Bath. 15/12/2016
Charlotte Newman 10 Otago Terrace, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SX S 15/12/2016: I wish to support the submission for Cleveland Baths to be restored & eventually have the opportunity to re-open. 15/12/2016
Fiona Jonhson 39 St John's Road, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6PZ, S 15/12/2016: It would be great for the pools to be restored to their former glory. 15/12/2016
Nancy 32 Manor Cottages, West Chelborough, Dorset, DT2 0PY S 15/12/2016: I support the bid to refurbish this historic and functional outdoor pool. 15/12/2016
Gill Simpson 40 Old Newbridge Hill, Newbridge, Bath, BA1 3LU, S 15/12/2016: I support the restoration of the Cleveland pools 15/12/2016
Kathleen Sylvia Dodd 23 Georgian View, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2LZ S 15/12/2016:
This is part of our heritage ,our memories .How I loved visits there.
15/12/2016
Jane Byford 19 Huson Road, Warfield, RG42 2QX S 15/12/2016: I think it is important to restore this historic pool. Outdoor swimming is increasingly popular and this will be a real asset for locals and visitors. 15/12/2016
Lucy Trafford Emberton House, 36 Bathwick Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6PA S 15/12/2016: Fantastic idea 15/12/2016
Lou Punt 54 Milton Avenue, Bear Flat, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4RA S 15/12/2016: Please let this historical heritage continue for the next future generations 15/12/2016
Joanne Rowntree 9 Old Newbridge Hill, Newbridge, Bath, BA1 3LX, S 15/12/2016: Support 15/12/2016
Harriet Talley 34 Apsley Road, Newbridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3LP S 15/12/2016: I support the proposal 15/12/2016
Sarah Noad 27 Lynfield Park, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4ER S 15/12/2016: Would be fantastic for Bath to have this historic pool re opened again, the success of the lido in Clifton is proof that it will work. 15/12/2016
Hannah Seward-thompson 72 Cotswold Way, NP11 6RG S 15/12/2016: I fully support the application 15/12/2016
Ann Wilson 12 George's Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EY S 15/12/2016: What an amazing asset to the city and its communities this pool would be if renovated. 15/12/2016
Sally Kruger-paget 5 Fairfield Avenue, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NH S 15/12/2016: I support the application 15/12/2016
Lola Straw 12 Southstoke Road, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5SJ S 15/12/2016: I used to swim in the pools as a. Hold and loved having an outdoor pool to go to. I would love that also for my children and the community. 15/12/2016
Deborah Lee 17 Old Church Road, Uphil, WSM, BS23 4UH R 15/12/2016: What lovely asset this would be, something to be treasured and not neglected 15/12/2016
A Jamieson 19 Chapel Street, Stroud, GL5 1DU S 15/12/2016: I worked daily in bath for many years and feel outdoor public swimming places are invaluable resources that should be preserved for multiple reasons not least history and health.
15/12/2016
Susannah Sadler Musbury Barn, Axminster, EX13 8AE S 15/12/2016: Fully support and would visit this facility 15/12/2016
Rebecca Bray 60 Broadmoor Lane, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4LA S 15/12/2016: We live in a spa town, with limited access to water! Apart from an ageing public pool. It would be such a tremendous asset to the city and the locals. 15/12/2016
Jayne O'connor 528 Wellsway, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2UD S 15/12/2016: This would be a huge asset to the local people of Bath and a fantastic way to encourage our young people into the outdoors. I have no doubt it would be extremely popular and easy pay for itself within a couple of years. Come on Bath Council, it's time to invest in local families and not just tourists!! Our young people need more facilities... 15/12/2016
Tracy Wilkins 38 Georgian View, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2LZ S 15/12/2016: Restore the baths for future generations 15/12/2016
Astrid 40 Rosslyn Road, Newbridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3LH S 15/12/2016: This would be fabulous for bath 15/12/2016
Sarah Benamar 52 Down Avenue, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5QJ S 15/12/2016: Would love to have this beautiful baths restored. 15/12/2016
Simon Chippendale 39 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 15/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
15/12/2016
Robbie Mathews Watarrka, The Normans, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6TD S 15/12/2016: Would be a huge asset to Bath, and a wonderful fresh air venue for young people. Used to go there myself. 15/12/2016
Kate Scully 25 Newbridge Road, Newbridge, Bath, BA1 3HE, S 15/12/2016: I think this project is very important for the tourist industry but is more important and needed but the local people of bath! 15/12/2016
Annie Beardsley 2 Ragland Street, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6HP S 15/12/2016: As a very keen outdoor swimmer, I would be thrilled to have Cleveland Baths open again. My 38 yr old son used to swim there when he was in primary school, and it was a great resource. Swimming is one of the best forms of exercise for general fitness. 15/12/2016
Serra Kerrigan 7 St Ann's Place, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2BJ R 15/12/2016: The pool would be a fantastic addition to Bath, creating another accessible community hub. 15/12/2016
Ailsa Vincent 8 Park Chase, Guildford, GU1 1ES S 15/12/2016: One of the great pleasures visiting Bath is to explore the historic swimmimg pools. Having had to queue to get into some it shows what a great amenity another historic pool will be for the many tourists who still come to Bath to enjoy the waters! 15/12/2016
Tamara Rundle 25 Tory, Bradford On Avon, Wilts, BA15 1NN S 15/12/2016: Very pleased this is moving forward, our whole family will walk the canal to go and swim in the Pools when they're ready. Thank you 15/12/2016
Matt Elder 9 River Place, Twerton, Bath, BA2 1AZ, S 15/12/2016: I support this! 15/12/2016
Simon Scott Beckford View, Gloucester Road, Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 8AD S 15/12/2016: Something to be proud of 15/12/2016
Charles Brindley 22 Shelley Road, Bear Flat, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4RJ S 03/01/2017: I think this is a wonderful idea and should receive the full support from the council and community. 03/01/2017
Julie Considine 44 Brighton Road, Aldershot, GU12 4HQ, S 31/12/2016: A local amenity for the local community not only for today but for the future. It must be preserved to help give a better quality of life and bring people together to share happy times. 31/12/2016
Alex Geddis 17 Nottingham Road, BS7 9DH , S 31/12/2016: This has been a great community resource and has the potential to become so again. Organised events have demonstrated a pleasing degree of interest and support by all age groups. 31/12/2016
Bryn Jones 7 Dowding Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6QJ S 01/01/2017: A splendid proposal which would be a real asset to the local community and wider market of visitors to Bath 01/01/2017
Sue Lucy Flat 5 Third Floor , 8 Edward Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DU S 06/12/2016: I fully support the Restoration of this historic open-air public swimming pool and associated facilities at Cleveland Baths, Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath 06/12/2016
Charlotte Allard 2 Fox Cottages, Church Lane, Monkton Combe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7EX O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Ruth Baby 14 Apollo House , Ipswich, IP2 9LH S 16/12/2016: This would be a great attraction to the area 16/12/2016
Ann Montgomery 32 Anglesey Road, Wigston, Leicester, LE184XA S 16/12/2016: Outdoor swimming is much healthier and more enjoyable. 16/12/2016
Ian Hobbs 54 Derby Way , Stevenage , Herts , SG1 5TR S 16/12/2016: What an amazing place! 16/12/2016
Sophie Sidonio 65 Ringswell Gardens, Lambridge, Bath, BA1 6BN, O 16/12/2016: A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
16/12/2016
Deborah Robinson 4 Wine Street, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1NS S 16/12/2016: I support the application 16/12/2016
Miriam Salo 16 Sherrard Way, Mytchett, Camberley, GU16 6GU S 16/12/2016: Would be fantastic to have such a lovely lido to visit. 16/12/2016
Renu Khosla 44 Warminster Road, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6XJ S 16/12/2016: I support the application 16/12/2016
Theresa Bristow 33 Julian Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham, MG2 5AJ S 16/12/2016: There are not enough of theses facilities 16/12/2016
Brenda Shipley 2 Southdown Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1JG S 16/12/2016: Fantastic opportunity to restore something from the past for the residence of Bath today 16/12/2016
Jayne Carman 26 Camp Lane, Handsworth, Birmingham, B21 8JS S 16/12/2016: I support the restoration of public bathing pools for all who enjoy outside swimming 16/12/2016
Helen Reeves Flat 6 , 30 The Paragon, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5LY S 16/12/2016: I really hope this gets the go ahead 16/12/2016
Sarah 35 Raven Street , DE22 3WA S 16/12/2016: What a beautiful lido, we have hathersage outdoor pool here in Derbyshire that is loved by locals and visitors alike. These places are so special and unique. I look forward to visiting in the future. 16/12/2016
James Earp Park Drea, Farrington Road, Paulton, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS39 7LP S 16/12/2016: Fully support the restoration of this important part of Bath's long history. It will be a huge asset for many generations to come. 16/12/2016
Louise Apthorpe 89 Sefton Park Road, St Andrews, BS7 9AW S 16/12/2016: Fully support 16/12/2016
Jacky Akam 77 Henwick Lane , Thatcham, RG18 3BX S 16/12/2016: Pools like these are a fantastic community resource and becoming more and more popular attracting visitors to the area. 16/12/2016
V Barnett 19 Winchester Road, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3LF S 16/12/2016: I support the application 16/12/2016
Bryn Dineen 16 Hampton View, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6JL S 16/12/2016: What a fabulous boon to the community and the visiting global visitors! 16/12/2016
Christine Steel 23 Palairet Close, Bradford On Avon, BA15 1UT S 16/12/2016: This is an excellent project which when completed will provide Bath with another tourist attraction. 16/12/2016
Elizabeth Harris Flat 23, Didsbury Court, Wilmslow Road, M20 6AD S 16/12/2016: This would be an asset to the local area and community 16/12/2016
Clare Furniss 1 Victoria Place, St Saviour's Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6RW S 16/12/2016: This is a wonderful opportunity to restore a historic Georgian lido, enhancing Bath's reputation as a heritage site and providing residents and tourists with a unique facility. As a Bath resident I fully support this application. 16/12/2016
Verity Hood 2 The Circus, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2EW S 17/12/2016: I support the application of the restoration of the historic open air swimming pool and its facilities. 17/12/2016
Angela Sycamore 71 Walkmill Lane, Kingswood, Wotton Under Edge , Glos, GL12 8SA S 17/12/2016: I support the renovation of the Baths 17/12/2016
Deb Conner 32 Gubyon Ave, London , SE24 0DX S 17/12/2016: Please restore these amazing baths for the piblic 17/12/2016
Ben Jones Springfield Farm, Woolverton, Bath, BA27RH S 17/12/2016: I support the Cleveland Pools project. 17/12/2016
Rachel Withers 36A St Kilda's Road, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3QL S 04/01/2017: As someone who grew up in Bath and who has immensely fond memories of swimming at the Cleveland Pool, I wholeheartedly support the Trust's project.

To have the Cleveland Pools operating again along the lines planned by the Trust would be marvellous - it's a beautiful and historically important site and it urgently needs to be rescued. Everyone in Bath stands to gain from this restoration.
04/01/2017
Nicole Mehta 27B Windermere Road, London, S5 4TJ S 04/01/2017: While I am not familiar with the area or the pool, I have seen photos and articles on it and with the beautiful historic setting it is firmly on the list of places I would like to visit to swim - I swim outdoors as often as I can and do plan weekends away around swim spots.
I am sure I am not alone and would ask you do all you can to preserve this beautiful venue and enable public swimming access to it.
Many thanks
04/01/2017
Jane Leitch 2 Upper Hedgemead Road, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5NE S 02/01/2017: I fully support the refurbishment of the pools which our otherwise going to fall into further disrepair.

I also believe given the unique nature of the pools that it will be a great asset to Bath attracting visitors boosting the Bath economy.
02/01/2017
Penny MacKichan The Old Farm, Charlcombe Lane, Charlcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 8DS S 02/01/2017: I support this application. This would be a wonderful addition to the facilities Bath offers. Unusual too. There can't be many (any?) Georgian open swimming pools, or lidos, left in the country. A fully functioning one would enhance Bath's attraction as a tourist destination and would greatly benefit Bath's residents. 02/01/2017
Lucy Hodge Audley House, Park Gardens, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2XP S 02/01/2017: I fully support the application. I feel the reopening of the Lido will restore a fantastic resource to the community, encouraging exercise and the enjoyable experience of swimming outdoors for all. It is will be wonderful to restore this historical building. I am particularly pleased that the green transport plan will promote and facilitate sustainable ways of travelling to the pool. 02/01/2017
John Hodge Audley House, Park Gardens, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2XP S 02/01/2017: The city of Bath should embrace the opportunity to add this remarkable building to its already UNESCO-recognised portfolio of architectural gems. Furthermore, this would be an amenity that could be used by residents and tourists alike, a living part of the city rather than just a frontage to be admired. This is the oldest purpose built outdoor pool in Britain and it is vital that restoration take place now before it crumbles and is lost forever. Its location is a further part of its attraction, sandwiched between two other great features of the city - the canal and the river, and would make it an ideal destination by boat, by bike, and on foot. 02/01/2017
Amanda Harwood Manor Lodge, Llangattock, NP25 5NG S 17/12/2016: This facility must reopen. It is a fantastic opportunity to revive safe outdoor swimming and to promote a healthy lifestyle for locals and others that will come to use the facility again, if it can be reopened. 17/12/2016
Helen Hannah Whistlestop Cottage, Station Road, Sway, Hants, SO41 6BA S 17/12/2016: I know I am not local, but I do visit Somerset frequently. I also love open water swimming and if this lido was open I would make special effort to come and visit several times a year. In the UK we need more "safe" places for people to exercise while enjoying the outdoors and the Council would have my full support in renovating this unique place and opening it for public use once more. 17/12/2016
Geoff Hooper 192 The Butts, Frome, BA11 4AG S 17/12/2016: A facility that improves the well being and health of the people of Bath and beyond, in a beautiful and historic, environment should be applauded. Local objection about traffic should be acknowledged, but should not override the overwhelming benefit of this project. Local residents would have an open air pool they could walk to, how about that? 17/12/2016
Jessica Nutt 1 Westbourne Gardens, Trowbridge, Wilts, BA14 9AW S 17/12/2016: This is such a great, innovative application and I wholeheartedly support it. This is long overdue and such a great project to enhance the other historical sites in a World Heritage city. This opportunity could so easily have been lost so please do not let this great plan slip away! Families local and visiting deserve to have an affordable day out in beautiful surroundings such as this. The river access is such a good idea too. Lidos are now attracting a larger following so this is an opportune moment for this to go ahead. 17/12/2016
Helen Crookston 28 Cleveland Walk, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6JU S 17/12/2016: Wonderful place must be saved.
Tourists can arrive by boat
17/12/2016
Fiona Cassidy Dulce Domum, 1 Wellow Lane, Hinton Charterhouse, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7SU S 17/12/2016: This would be a fantastic place. 17/12/2016
Beth Lintern 41 Alpine Gardens, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5PD S 17/12/2016: This would be brilliant for the community and rekindle a great tradition in Bath. We are so lucky to have the country's only remaining Georgian lido and we should restore our heritage. 17/12/2016
Cathy French Mews House, Linden Gardens, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2YB S 17/12/2016: A fantastic project! I can't wait to go swimming there on a glorious summers day! Bravo to all the volunteers at Cleveland Pools Trust who have worked so hard to make this project happen. 17/12/2016
Hannah Thielen 15 Bibury Road, Swindon , SN3 1DD S 17/12/2016: Make it happen! 17/12/2016
Michael Ringham Five Stones, Primrose Hill, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2UT S 17/12/2016: Just Great...and about time this little gem was re-opened. 17/12/2016
R P Barron 19 Marlborough Buildings, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2LY S 17/12/2016: I very much support the plans for the old Clevedon baths 17/12/2016
Sarah Hercod 28 Summers Street, Lostwithiel, PL22 0DH S 17/12/2016: I think this is a fantastic idea which would benefit Bath residents and visitors alike. The perfect alternative to the very busy and touristy Spa experience. I'm sure this lido could be marketed for the outdoor swimming enthusiast and would attract a committed bunch of locals. 17/12/2016
Stephen Seeley 3 Claverton Road, Saltford, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS31 3DW S 17/12/2016: I believe this would be a welcome asset to Bath and provide a unique attraction to the Region. Unlike other attractions around the country I can see this being fully utilised by visitors and residents alike. 17/12/2016
Frank Tompson Flat 23 Nelson House, Nelson Place West, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2TL S 17/12/2016: I support this planning application 22/12/2016
Tom Foulstone Rosemont Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 17/12/2016: The C.P.T’s plans for the Cleveland Pools are totally out of scale and unsympathetic to the site and the local community.

Close inspection of the C.P.T’s plans reveals that they have the potential to do huge harm to Hampton Row and the Bathwick Estate.

The C.P.T’s business plan is deeply flawed and unsustainable. It is driven by what will make the most money to support the hot water open air swimming that the C.P.T are fixated on. Hot water open air swimming widely known to loose money and need subsidy unless it is supported by very large numbers of swimmers in addition to other revenue streams. This site obviously has a pool but it was never designed or intended to be a business the size of which is needed to support open air hot water swimming without subsidy. Added to this the pools also flood on a regular basis which means the non chemical filters needed are a hugely expensive on-going cost. Hot water open air swimming is a very seductive idea but the site is just not suitable for this. The C.P.T’s answer to this fundamental problem is to build more buildings on the site to increase its commercialism, ignore any history of the pools that may get in the way of revenue, and try to attract an inappropriate number of swimmers during all possible daylight hours during the summer.

The negative fallout of this will be extreme for the immediate neighbours and the local community as a whole.

Lottery projects are supposed to be about the local community and have a positive effect, but this will have the opposite and I am worried that the lure of the lottery millions which is tied to the C.P.T’s proposal is going to compromise sensible judgement and scrutiny of the proposal.

There has been no Impact Assessment on the local community or even the immediate neighbourhood.

The expected total number of visitors of 36,000 in a 20 week period would simply overwhelm our street and change it beyond recognition.

The opening hours of 7am until 9pm 7 days a week for this open air business in a river valley which amplifies noise means no peace during daylight hours for the surrounding neighbourhood all summer.

There is a total lack of green travel plan which will bring more car traffic into an already dangerously polluted part of Bath.

The Business plan reveals an over-reliance on non swimming revenue, catered for with a cafe and private hire (which can mean anything from kids party’s to wedding receptions) to bring in the money needed to off set the swimming loss. This effectively turns the pools into a outdoor venue not just a pool, and as such should be expected to generate the noise and local disturbance of any outdoor venue open 7am until 9pm 7 days a week. These private hire events would need to be serviced by all the traffic and deliveries you would expect for a venue, and the cafe would need the same. All of which need access via our quiet street. If a new open air venue tried to open anywhere in Bath with those operating hours I am sure it would be turned down flat, let alone a new venue with access problems in a quiet totally residential area.

Approx 5 foot of frontage and access means that a business of the size proposed will have to take up a large portion of Hampton Row. It will completely take up the existing parking in front of neighbouring property’s with its proposed disabled parking, off site buggy park, bins and recycling, delivery bay, parking for bikes etc. This will put unacceptable pressure on an already crowded street, as well as being grossly unfair for the owners of the property’s in question.

There is no plan for the construction process, bearing in mind the access difficulty and the sensitivity of the site. We have been told by the C.P.T that decisions on access and construction will be made by the eventual contractor. I suspect that this issue has been deliberately avoided as the C.P.T realise the lack of frontage and a small access gap will mean it is deemed necessary to annexe parts of the street and allotments for the duration of the build and realise this will be extremely unpopular and controversial.

The C.P.T’s communication method throughout this whole process seems to be that if the local community don’t know what is going to happen they are less likely to complain. I would even say they have treated the immediate neighbours to the pools with contempt.
17/12/2016
Diane Davies 41A Grosvenor Place, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6BA S 17/12/2016: I fully support the renovation 17/12/2016
Suzannah Geake 81 Lacy Road, SW15 1NR S 17/12/2016: Thanks 17/12/2016
Meg Owen 4 Well Street, Llanberis, Gwynedd, LL55 4EW S 17/12/2016: My childhood (near Bristol) was all the richer for having places outside where we could swim. Outdoor swimming seems to be growing in popularity again, and this place looks lovely. I hope to be able to swim in Cleveland Bath in the future - it's certainly an added incentive to come and visit Bath! 17/12/2016
Jim Edmiston 5 Prior Park Cottages, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4NR S 17/12/2016: The proposal to restore Cleveland Bath is too exciting an opportunity for BATHNES to miss. Unique in the country, this example of Georgian architecture ought to be saved by the one city that is known worldwide for its Georgian heritage. It is an obvious addition to our tourist attractions and would be such a sad loss to the local community historically, architecturally and economically. 17/12/2016
Julia Schlotel Penvivian, Gooanamrris, St Stephen, Cornwall , PL26 7QX S 17/12/2016: Outdoor swimming is so fantastic for both body and mind, and seeing a real rise in popularity. Its definitely worth restoring this wonderful place, and I, like many other swimmers, like to find swim spots all around the country and will certainly visit. 17/12/2016
Mary Smith 9 Southern Road, SO419HR S 17/12/2016: Looks like it could be amazing 17/12/2016
Katherine Holden 30 Charlcombe Lane, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NS S 22/12/2016: An incredibly important historic project which will be much appreciated by local residents including members of the Larkhall History Society. 22/12/2016
Jon Adams 3 Pulteney Grove, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4HQ S 28/12/2016: I'm backing this proposal 28/12/2016
Mary Stacey 56 Sydney Buildings, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6DB S 28/12/2016: I strongly support this application which is a creditable scheme to restore an important historic building at risk and enables it to be used for its original purpose. It will provide a healthgiving amenity for locals and encourage children to learn to swim. 28/12/2016
Susan Traill 14 Grosvenor Place, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6AX R 28/12/2016: The plans to restore Cleveland Pools, or Cleveland Bath, have been designed with great care to bring the history of the Pools to life and to provide a venue that will give the public the best means of enjoying this historic treasure and at the same time enjoying the healthy outdoor exercise for which the Georgian lido was built. The original entrance will be kept and the public will be encouraged to travel by public transport (bus and river ferry) or on foot or by bicycle, thus maintaining the tranquility and beauty of the setting and the integrity of its history. This exceptional amenity will give residents and visitors alike an experience of Bath that has been missing for many decades. It will be the ultimate interactive Georgian attraction. 28/12/2016
Geoffrey Ayliffe-Fletcher 5 Mezellion Place, Camden Road, Beacon Hill, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EJ S 22/12/2016: Certainly a project worth doing as my Wife has such fond memories of enjoying some of her childhood there.
We are sure this would give many, many people great enjoyment, although sensible consideration given to the close proximity of neighbours which should not be too difficult to do. Thank you

22/12/2016
Matthew Nesbeth 4 Felix Road, BS5 0JL S 22/12/2016: This is a great opportunity to rejuvenate this great local artefact which no doubt has international significance. 22/12/2016
Alex Schlesinger 16 - 17 Walcot Buildings, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6AD S 22/12/2016: Personally, and on behalf of the LRSHP, I would like to express full support for the trustees of the Cleveland Pools Trust. The restoration and revitalisation of the pool is as long overdue as it is essential. This complex of buildings is seriously at risk and further delays must be avoided. 22/12/2016
Mary Anne Carling Flat 16, St Swithins Yard, Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BG, S 22/12/2016: Will help to encourage locals to exercise as well historical 22/12/2016
Sheila Andrews 2 Bellhanger Court, Morford Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2RD S 22/12/2016: I started 'wild swimming' for the first time this year at Farleigh Hungerford swimming Club which uses a small stretch of the River Frome. It was a wonderful and exhilarating experience through the summer into late Autumn.
I live in Bath and would really love to use the Cleveland Pools once they are renovated. Its a long way to Farleigh Hungerford and no public transport there.

There is nothing quite like swimming in the open air! It is good fun and health promoting at the same time. I have volunteered from time to time at the Pools and really support this venture. It is so local and in a wonderful setting. It offers a good place for all ages to come and swim, relax and enjoy the beautiful setting.
It has my complete support,
22/12/2016
David Camm 17 Blenheim Gardens, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NL S 22/12/2016: As a long time resident of Bath who used the Cleveland baths as a youngster, I would like to hope that the upcoming generations will have the fun and pleasure that myself and my friends did. I was a wonderful facility and having seen the plans, I sincerely believe it will be even better. Not to mention that I believe it is the oldest outdoor pool in the whole of the UK. What an asset for Bath and what a tragedy if after all the work so far it doesn't fulfil its promise and open.
Please support this application.
Regards
David Camm
22/12/2016
Michael Tichelar 2 Southbourne Gardens, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6LZ S 22/12/2016: This is a project of national and historical significance and will support Bath as a World Heritage Site. For this reason alone it should be supported. 22/12/2016
M Hayward 3 The Grove, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4AT S 22/12/2016: I support this application which provides a unique facility for the local community and for tourists which Bath needs. 22/12/2016
Naomi Sani 27 Forester Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QD S 22/12/2016: I would like to add my support for the restoration of this historic site. To preserve the oldest outdoor purpose built swimming pool for future generations is the responsible action to take. It is predicted that one of the biggest challenges of the future will be how to meaningfully occupy increased leisure time - so having such a valuable facility in the community will be a huge asset. 22/12/2016
Phil Sani 27 Forester Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QD S 22/12/2016: I belive this sympathetic renovation of a listed building will be a valuable asset for the local community. This historic property has been derelict for too long.
I wholeheartedly support the planning application and look forward to using the facilities.
22/12/2016
Chris Curran Fir Tree Cottage, Rosemont Place, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6BJ, O 22/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high summer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
22/12/2016
Gabriele Turnbull Flat 2 , 1 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 22/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high summer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
22/12/2016
Mrs A Calvert-Jones Somerset House, , 1 Church Street, , Widcombe, , Bath, BA2 6AZ S 22/12/2016: The refurbishment of the country's only surviving Georgian lido provides a wonderful opportunity to create a new Bath attraction. A historic venue that could tempt more visitors to the City and provide facilities for all to enjoy. This lido is so close to the beautiful River Avon and within walking distance of the City centre, it is too good an opportunity to miss.

22/12/2016
Queenie 2 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 22/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high summer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
22/12/2016
Nick Skelsey 67 Shakespeare Avenue, Bear Flat, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4RG S 22/12/2016: This project will deliver an outstanding social and leisure facility, for both the local community and visitors alike. It is clear to me, from visiting one of the recent Open Days, that the scheme is well balanced to meet the needs of a range of different stakeholders, and has been well thought through in an extensive design and consultation process. It has my full support, and will be a great facility for my children in particular as they move towards their teenage years. 22/12/2016
Elizabeth White Star Cottage, , Star Corner,, Colerne, , Wiltshire, SN14 8DG S 22/12/2016: I have supported the enthusiastic and committed group of people who have fought to save the Cleveland Pools from the beginning. Having established the Trust and achieved the recognition of the Grade ll* Listing, people have been attracted from further afield, and it has been heartening that bodies like the Princes Regeneration Trust and others with professional knowledge have become involved with the ideas and planning. The continual increase of help and support from active volunteers and those with specialist expertise has shown how important this site is, not only to local people, but nationwide and latterly internationally with European spa representatives visiting. It's fascinating history is valued by everyone and as the oldest purpose built lido in the country deserves to return to use as so many have envisaged and planned for - from professionals to former users. (I was one of those). There is no other open swimming locally and the young in particular will again have the joy of this experience with their families and friends. So many visitors on the Open Days who remember have regaled us with their memories and support the project. Access is of course a well discussed point and much work has gone into taking care that this is addressed. Arriving by boat from the river will encourage visitors to Bath to share a new experience. Alternatively people may walk or cycle from the centre of town or by the canal. Some buses stop a short distance away and so car parking will not be an issue for local residents. Already people have been interested in using the venue for special occasions. This is a unique site to be treasured and Bath and its residents and visitors should benefit both from the facility as well as the communal experience for another generation at least. 22/12/2016
Peter Davis 25 The Circus, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2EU S 22/12/2016: This seems an excellent, and long overdue, rescue of significant heritage. Plans appear to be very thorough and professional. It is good that they encompass improvements necessary to make future use of the Pools attractive - not least the incorporation of heat-pump and kiosk/kitchen facilities (I remember finding the pool bitterly cold, even at the height of summer, and the very limited refreshments both tacky and expensive). Likewise proper toilet facilities. [No doubt locker facilities etc are too detailed and transient to affect overall planning permission.] I support this application. 22/12/2016
Matt Somerville 9 Belvedere, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5ED S 23/12/2016: As a project founded in the support of the local and wider community in Bath it's great to see this develop into the well-considered suite of proposals presented in this application. The heritage asset is unique, and deserves broader recognition as a place that embodies the connection between built heritage and landscape that makes Bath so special. This project will enable the baths to be enjoyed by international and local visitors alike and represents a fantastic opportunity to breathe life into a place that had been allowed to disappear from public view for too long. I am confident this application will be fully supported, and would strongly encourage this myself. 23/12/2016
K Shimazu 29 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QW O 23/12/2016: I strongly object to this particular application on the basis that this is a residential area that would not be able to sustain a concern of this nature. I do not feel that the intention of hosting corporate events with a late licence is in keeping with this area and would disturb the pleasant area we live in. I also feel that, the proposed 36,000 visitors a year is viable at all. We do not have the infrastrucuture in this area in terms of the size of the roads or available parking to make this possible or easy to live with. In aslo use the footpath on the other side of the river regularly and am not happy that the view of the Lido and buildings would be obscured by toilet blocks. I think that there is room for restoration in some form but not to the detriment of those people already living here, and am therefore strongly opposed to this application. 23/12/2016
Peter Brian Hartley 8 Shays Drive, Clitheroe, Lancashire, BB7 1LL, S 23/12/2016: An historic community asset would be created 23/12/2016
Amanda Boston 33 Hampton View, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6JL S 23/12/2016: I very much support the application to restore the very special Georgian lido. It would be wonderful to have an
open air swimming facility again in Bath. It is in a special setting, and will breath life into that area of the river!
Many people talk of the past and how special it was to swim there,also a safe and sociable place to meet that is healthy( not food and drink driven).As parking is impossible, people will have the added benefits of walking or cycling to get there. It will also attract visitors to the city, who enjoy outdoor pursuits, which will bring in business to the city.
23/12/2016
Brian Webber Flat 3 Henrietta Court, Bathwick Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6PG S 23/12/2016: I support the ambition to restore a remarkable heritage asset. However, the out-of-the-way location and the unusual changing facilities may impact on patronage and financial viability. The traffic plan (during and after the restoration works) will be crucial to the success of the project and to safeguarding the amenity of the neighbouring community. 23/12/2016
Sheila Stewart 7 Southcot Place, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4PE S 23/12/2016: This is an opportunity to develop a valuable amenity for the residents of Bath. It will create a social community that is affordable for all. In the light of so much emphasis on student accommodation and tourists, this will demonstrate that we care about local people. 23/12/2016
Karen Phelps 65 Bay Tree Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NE S 24/12/2016: We fully support this application and would love to see the pools restored to their former glory. Bath is lacking an outdoor pool and I believe it will be incredibly popular. 24/12/2016
Helen Davies 1 Eden Terrace, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6TQ S 24/12/2016: I have many happy memories as a child of swimming in the pool! It would be wonderful if I could give my Grandchildren the chance of doing the same! Please allow the restoration to proceed! 24/12/2016
Frederick Parkinson Jazira, Gloucester Road, Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 8BH S 25/12/2016: My Comments: -
I support this project not only for the benefit of open air swimming for myself, but for Bath residents and the wider community. Not only will it see an existing good-sized swimming pool be put to use, it also combines maintaining our heritage. I doubt the opening of the pool will have much impact on the immediate local community, perhaps it may for the first few weeks after opening. Thereafter, the impact will be minimal. Numbers of attendees will be limited to the capacity of the treatment facilities and numbers permitted in the pool at any one time. These are 400-600 per day, spread over the duration of opening hours. It is intended to open for the summer months only, and numbers will be far less than this for most of the time, due to the inevitable inclement weather.
The proposed development is extremely limited: the plans are to concentrate on improving what is already there, with the addition of an UNDERGROUND treatment plant, small café / refreshments kiosk and toilet block with showers.
25/12/2016
D Webb 17 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QN O 26/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.
The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms. This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths.
One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the....pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).
The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund. One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable. Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood. The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high Summer. Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution.
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’. This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.
Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac. On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars. As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full- time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue. Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns. Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads. This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.
We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
28/12/2016: It seems that the intention for the use of these pools has changed beyond all recognition. This project was "sold" to Bath residents as a restoration of the pools for use in the main by those same Bath residents. I object to these pools being used as yet another tourist attraction and the fact that the new planning includes infringement on the view from the river. I would imagine there are also implications on flooding. The infra structure to support a commercial enterprise is not in place nor desirable. Bath is a world heritage city; its beauty lies in its juxtaposition of city against stunning countryside. Bathwick Estate is just that, a small housing estate, providing homes for residents who serve the city and community. The Cleveland Trust has misled this planning and locals would certainly not have supported it had they known the intent. 28/12/2016: It seems that the intention for the use of these pools has changed beyond all recognition. This project was "sold" to Bath residents as a restoration of the pools for use in the main by those same Bath residents. I object to these pools being used as yet another tourist attraction and the fact that the new planning includes infringement on the view from the river. I would imagine there are also implications on flooding. The infra structure to support a commercial enterprise is not in place nor desirable. Bath is a world heritage city; its beauty lies in its juxtaposition of city against stunning countryside. Bathwick Estate is just that, a small housing estate, providing homes for residents who serve the city and community. The Cleveland Trust has misled this planning and locals would certainly not have supported it had they known the intent. 28/12/2016
J H Smallwood 21 Napier Road, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4LN S 26/12/2016: An excellent project for Bath.
Two minor suggestions. Rooftop solar power might be added to provide some heating for pool water or showers.
It might be worth the riverside gate having a child-proof latch. i.e. at head height.
26/12/2016
Anthony Griffiths 5 Beaufort West, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6QB S 26/12/2016: Bath is justifiably proud of its designation as a World Heritage City. Restoration of the Cleveland Pools to usable condition would add an additional attraction to the City open to residents and visitors alike; restore to use a facility that was in continuous use as swimming pools from not later than 1815 to the 1970s; make open to the public the oldest known, purpose-built, open air pools in the UK; provide a centre of interesting information regarding the history of the pools and their 'resurrection'; remove the pools from the Buildings At Risk Register; encourage more use of the river and other eco-friendly means of transport for access to the Pools and bring to a successful conclusion the consultation that has gone on now for many years. Approval of the application would further confirm BANES' determination to preserve Bath and its heritage in a sensible, practical manner. 26/12/2016
Dr Lyn Barham 8 Lansdown Crescent, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5EX S 27/12/2016: The Cleveland Pools are such an important item within our collective local heritage, and potentially a public amenity of great value. I have visited from time to time and kept tabs on the development of plans. It seems to me that all has been done with the greatest care and sensitivity, and I most strongly support the current application. 27/12/2016
Michele Donald 163 Bath Road, , Atworth, , Wilts, SN128JR S 27/12/2016: Delighted to hear there is a chance that this wonderful open space can we restored to a beautiful open air swimming space - just what Bath needs 27/12/2016
Pam Penkman Jazira, Gloucester Road, Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 8BH S 28/12/2016: I strongly support Cleveland Pools Trust’s application for planning permission for this outdoor pool. Apart from the historical interest attached to the 200 year old building and the pools as they have evolved over the last two centuries, this project is well worth supporting for the amenity and benefit it will provide to the people of Bath. There is no outdoor pool in Bath and the nearest ones are 20 miles away. It’s important to remember that this is a community enterprise, not a hard-nosed commercial venture. So it is aiming to break even, while being able to accumulate enough funds to finance essential maintenance. The Trust aims to generate sufficient income through ticket sales to achieve this without making the tickets so expensive that ordinary people cannot afford to come along to the pool regularly for their swim. This requires a certain number of swimmers during the 20 or so weeks during the year when the pool will be open. The project will not succeed, and will not be supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, if there is no prospect of it breaking-even. Reductions in hours or numbers of days when the pool is open would inevitably mean an increase in ticket prices which will exclude most people, especially families, destroying the whole concept and ethos of a pool for the people of Bath. Yes, access will be difficult and construction will be tricky, but the outcome for the majority of Bath residents will be wholly positive. 28/12/2016
Margaret Biggs 1 Riparian House, 83 St John's Road, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6PZ, S 28/12/2016: I support application 16/05632/FUL 28/12/2016
Alison Haley 15 Summerlays Court, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4HU S 28/12/2016: Used to swim here as a child in the early 70s. A wonderful facility as an enjoyable pastime but more importantly wonderful exercise which this society badly needs to take more of. Opening the historic lido would create opportunities for residents and visitors alike to participate in healthy exercise with low impact on the area, and would only enhance the prestige of this world heritage city. 28/12/2016
Peter Rollins 22 Alpine Gardens, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5PE S 28/12/2016: This is great project to restore one of Bath's most important historical sites. 28/12/2016
Dr John Lyon 4 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 28/12/2016: This application is historically destructive e.g. Women's pool. Insufficient planning for so large a number of people in such a short time, given pool flooding. Parking not realistically addressed.
I have no objection to the restoration and reopening of the historic pool but this plan is inadequate, insufficiently substantiated.
28/12/2016: This application is historically destructive e.g. Women's pool. Insufficient planning for so large a number of people in such a short time, given pool flooding. Parking not realistically addressed.
I have no objection to the restoration and reopening of the historic pool but this plan is inadequate, insufficiently substantiated.
28/12/2016
Janice Dreisbach Not Given S View Associated Documents 21/12/2016
Gail Shackley Ballochmyle, The Common, Parbold, West Lancs, WN8 7EB, S 16/12/2016: My 2 daughters and grandchildren live in Bath and we all love swimming out doors. One of my daughters recently moved to Bath from Woodhall Spa in Lincolnshire where there is a lovely pool in the park, so we are all missing that pool now she has moved! 16/12/2016
Christine Reilly Lanyon, South Thingley, Corsham, Wilts, SN13 8QL, S 16/12/2016: Spent all my childhood summers at this pool, would love my grandchildren to be able to do the same 21/12/2016
Carol Ludbrook 7315 State Highway 1, Ohaeawai , Northland , New Zealand , 0472, S 16/12/2016: I'm a Bartholian and this where I learnt to swim with my dear mother. I want to swim there again with my own children. It is an absolute gem of Bath. 16/12/2016: I'm a Bartholian and this where I learnt to swim with my dear mother. I want to swim there again with my own children. It is an absolute gem of Bath. 16/12/2016
Sally King Mount Eden, Beacon Edge, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 8SW, S 16/12/2016: You would be complete idiots if you failed to restore a living, useable heritage facility. 16/12/2016
Rachel Fletcher Jasmine Lodge, Frating Road, Great Bromley, CO7 7JN, R 16/12/2016: Although I'm not in your area I always try to swim outdoors when I visit a new area and regularly use my own local seasonal lido. Outdoor swimming is resurgent at the moment and this pool is part of our heritage. 16/12/2016
Magnus Weighton 52 Cherry Way, Alton, GU34 2AX, S 16/12/2016: Please let this fantastic project go ahead 16/12/2016
Joel James 25 King Edward Road, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3PD S 16/12/2016: I think it would be fantastic if these pools were restored to there former glory. 16/12/2016
Adam Gretton 54 Cedric Road, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3PB S 16/12/2016: I support the application. 16/12/2016
Catharine Brown 29 Forester Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QE O 28/12/2016: I am writing to object to the planning application to develop Cleveland Pools, due the adverse impact of the development on local residents, in two key areas:

1. Traffic
The residential area in which the pools is located simply cannot sustain the visitor numbers projected.

Large numbers of visitors will travel by car despite efforts to the contrary, and park illegally on week days, or legally on Sundays, making residential parking impossible.

The increase in vehicles (cars, coaches and delivery lorries) will have an adverse impact on road safety in this residential cul de sac which has a large proportion of families with small children resident.

There is insufficient access for coaches dropping off tour parties and for lorries making deliveries, either within the estate or on the main A36.

2. Visitor numbers
The Conservation Management Plan has failed to include one of the most important items of “negative significance” which is that the pools are located in a quiet residential area.

Remoteness and lack of vehicular access are included but not the detrimental effect that this development and large numbers of visitors will have on the residents of the Bathwick estate.

Catharine Brown
29 Forester Road
Bath
BA2 6QE
28/12/2016
Theresa Waterhouse 12 Brookleaze Buildings, Larkhall, Bath, BA1 6RA, S 18/12/2016: I am totally supportive of the application, it's so wonderful to restore this historic, beautiful pool and also provide a really useful facility for local families 18/12/2016
John Snell 1 Longhouse, The Hollow, Dunkerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 8BG S 18/12/2016: A really exciting and both locally and internationally important restoration. The plans are sympathetic and thoughtful as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund. Fantastic! 18/12/2016
Linda Daws 79 Entry Hill, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5LT S 18/12/2016: This is an excellent proposal to restore this swimming bath that many of us BATH residents used and enjoyed as a family , thud allowing future generations to enjoy the fantastic site.
•It involves the restoration and re-use of a Grade II* historic gem that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register;
•A sympathetic and thoughtful restoration is proposed, as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
•It's the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815);
•Renovation and interpretation will tell the extraordinary story of the Pools;
•It will be a community facility for residents and visitors alike;
•It’s identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
•The original ladies’ pool will be highlighted as part of a ‘Learning Centre’;
•A “green travel plan” will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car;
•There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents.
18/12/2016
Louis Brown 2 Mowbray Avenue, Exeter, EX4 4HB S 15/12/2016: Our heritage is vital. For local and national tourism. As well as keeping fit, healthy and interacting with others from the community. 15/12/2016
Rowan Tempo 13 Dover House, Snow Hill, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DE S 15/12/2016: A fantastic community project. Can't wait for it to be completed and take my daughter along. 15/12/2016
Helen Fripp 31 Kensington Gardens, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6LH S 15/12/2016: A wonderful project I fully support. Cannot wait to be able to walk to my local open air pool. Great for the whole family 15/12/2016
Marie Youngman 5 Lime Grove Gardens, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4HE S 15/12/2016: As a resident of bathwick, I support this application. 15/12/2016
Alison Jacobs 2A Eckweek Lane, Peasedown St. John, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 8PH S 15/12/2016: This really should be restored , such a great historical attraction should never have been allowed to degenerate in this way. 15/12/2016
Tamsin Egan 8 Tennyson Road, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3BG R 15/12/2016: My family and I are very Much looking forward to the renovation of the pools. We think they will be a fantastic resource for the residents of Bath to enjoy. 15/12/2016
Karen Rye 7 Station Road, Newbridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3DX S 15/12/2016: I think the pools will be a wonderful addition to our fantastic city. 15/12/2016
Rob Polden 4 Millbrook Court, Millbrook Place, Widcombe, Bath, BA2 4JY, S 15/12/2016: I think the restoration of this facility would greatly enhance Bath as a destination and benefit the residents of the city as well 15/12/2016
Bryan Johnson 4 Alexander Buildings, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6AT S 15/12/2016: Please make the right choice and make this happen. 15/12/2016
Andrew Harding 8 Gadfield Stret , Darwen, BB3 2AP R 15/12/2016: As an integral part of a Georgian city way of life, the historic & tourism value of having this restored can not be underestimated. An original, operational Lido must surely be supported by the council & all historical organisations.
Having this restored to its former glory can only be a good thing for Bath residents & tourists alike.
15/12/2016
Amanda Aston 6 Carlton Close, Cleethorpes, DN6 0NP S 15/12/2016: This project should be permitted, I spent many a happy day there as a child and although I no longer live in the B&NES area my grandchildren do and they would love a facility like the Cleveland Baths. 15/12/2016
Sarah Thelwall 36 Kings Keep, Beaufort Road, Kingston, KT1 2HP S 15/12/2016: I am fully in favour of restoring these historic baths 15/12/2016
Jamie Ridyard 4 Widcombe Crescent, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6AH S 15/12/2016: This is a great plan. Please approve 15/12/2016
Joel Lucy 99 Eastbury Way, Redhouse, Swindon, SN25 2HE S 15/12/2016: I used the facilities as a child and feel the full restoration of this site as outlined in the plans would be hugely beneficial to the local community and to those from further afield 15/12/2016
Margarette Parlett 25 Sylvan Road, Exeter, EX4 6EW S 15/12/2016: My daughter and her young family live in the Bath area and would love the opportunity to use this wonderful Georgian swimming pool - and so would I when I go to visit them! This is a fascinating project which would bring a unique heritage building back to life. 15/12/2016
Louise Ball Basement , 63 Great Pulteney Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DN S 15/12/2016: Couldn't be happier to see these facilities restored, especially as a Bathwick resident. They will not only be an asset to Bathwick, but to Bath as a whole. 15/12/2016
Benedict Brain 7 George's Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EY S 15/12/2016: Please give this vital project the green light. 15/12/2016
Sarah Cullen Garden Flat , 6 Johnstone Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DH S 15/12/2016: I fully support the plans to restore the Cleveland Pools. 15/12/2016
Veronica Wardell Ground Floor , 61 Great Pulteney Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DN S 15/12/2016: I want to make it known that I fully support this application. 15/12/2016
Jo Nye 151 Catherine Way, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7PB S 15/12/2016: I fully support this unique & worthwhile venture, having seen the plans for myself at the Open Day at the Baths during the summer, this will be a fantastic addition to the Bath Heritage landscape and it is of course of huge historical interest and to restore it will mean that it can be enjoyed by present & future generations of Bathonians & visitors to the area. 15/12/2016
Jane Bloore 20 Broadhurst, Ashtead, KT21 1QD S 15/12/2016: It will be a great facility please allow planning permission. 15/12/2016
Benedict Brain 7 George's Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EY S 15/12/2016: Please give this vital project the green light. 15/12/2016
Keeley Gore 78 Southdown Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1JH S 15/12/2016: Looking forward to visiting with my family on completion 15/12/2016
Mark Edwards 13 Dover House, Snow Hill, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DE S 15/12/2016: . 15/12/2016
Libby Sandbrook 12 Caroline Buildings, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4JH S 15/12/2016: We fully support the restoration of Cleveland Baths for many reasons from restoring a wonderful historical building to bringing back to life a great community asset. 15/12/2016
Anthony Grimley 4 Millers Place, London Road West, Lower Swainswick, Bath, BA1 7BT, S 15/12/2016: Bath is a spa city, famed for its waters.

Anything we can do to improve our offering to tourists in getting in touch with water, and to promote health of the community is a great thing. It would bring in more people to this area, and is by its nature a destination suitable for sustainable transport access: walking, cycling, even by row boat.

The proposal is sympathetic to the environs and enhances the local area.
15/12/2016
Tim Sutton 1 Helix Gardens, SW2 2JH S 15/12/2016: A pool I would definitely come visit. Great local attraction for tourists. 15/12/2016
Sue Lucy Flat 5 Third Floor , 8 Edward Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DU S 15/12/2016: I have wonderful memories of my son and I swimming at Cleveland Pool for a few years before it closed and is sadly missed. It is a wonderful, historic facility that will enrich our lives again when restored. 15/12/2016
Marc Wilson 6 Claremont Walk, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6HB S 15/12/2016: The pools will provide a wonderful resiurce 15/12/2016
Mike Mckenzie The Mews House, Pera Road, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5PA S 15/12/2016: I support the Restoration of this historic swimming pool, I'm sure it will be an asset and a valued facility for Bath residents and visitors. 15/12/2016
Evan Rudowski Flat 18 , 42 Great Pulteney Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DR S 15/12/2016: I fully support the application to refurbish and restore this historic pool as a vital resource to the community. 15/12/2016
N Burgess Not Given S 15/12/2016: What an amazing project to make happen. Would be an amazing community builder, increasing connections, health and wellbeing as well as history and cultural energy. Hope to see this happen. My children are very excited too! 15/12/2016
Gabriel Stillwater 3 St James's Square, Lansdown, Bath, BA1 2TR, S 15/12/2016: Please support the restoration of the open-air Swimming pool. Prove that Bath is not just for the tourists, but also the people who live here every day. 15/12/2016
Shawn Tomlinson Manor Farm House, Old Church Road, Hainford , NR10 3BG , S 15/12/2016: As a swimming teacher an open water swimmer I believe maintaining lidos is a vital part of our heritage 15/12/2016
Vicky 8 The Leys, BS21 7YQ S 15/12/2016: This is a beautiful resource that should be treasured! 15/12/2016
Susanne Schneider 18 Horncastle Road, Louth, LN11 9LD R 15/12/2016: Please please please save this beautiful lido in Bath - actually thought this was already happening. The value to the local public and visitors is huge. Can't wait to visit friends in Bath and swim here 15/12/2016
Clare Foster Double House, Double House Lane, Chew Magna, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS40 8TH S 15/12/2016: i fully support this application. 15/12/2016
Chris Billimore 16 Sydenham Buildings, Westmoreland, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3BS S 15/12/2016: Fantastic plans 15/12/2016
Oliver Jones 15 Larkhall Place, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SF S 15/12/2016: Please renovate the pool. 15/12/2016
Jo Shanmugalingam 37 Prior Park Road, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4NG S 15/12/2016: i support the restoration of these baths 15/12/2016
Fiona Haines 11A Grosvenor Villas, Claremont Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6QL S 15/12/2016: This will be a fabulous place to exercise and relax at with friends and family. I live close by and very much look forward to using this historic bathing site! 15/12/2016
Nick Haines 11A Grosvenor Villas, Claremont Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6QL S 15/12/2016: Fully support this application - can't wait to swim at Cleveland pools! 15/12/2016
Kirsty Bennett 41 Zetland Road, Bristol, BS6 7AH S 15/12/2016: I think this would be a great community resource and I would love to swim there with my family. 15/12/2016
Valentine Morby Mews House, Linden Gardens, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2YB S 13/12/2016: I am hugely in favour of saving this historic gem. Cleveland Pools are recognised as the oldest outdoor public swimming pools in England and need to be saved and re-opended for all the residents and visitors to our glorious world heritage city. 13/12/2016
Anita Kent 38 Sydney Buildings, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6DB S 13/12/2016: I support the project to restore the Cleveland Pools. 13/12/2016
Lucinda Burgess 8 Cork Street, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3BD S 15/12/2016: This would be great. 15/12/2016
Helen Sykes Three Winds, Picton, Yarm, North Yorkshire, TS15 0AG S 15/12/2016: Open air swimming is a delightful and important activity for all ages. Our mental and physical health is improved with every outdoor swim. Please agree to restore this once wonderful facility 15/12/2016
Alexandra Brin 7 George's Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EY S 15/12/2016: I support this application 15/12/2016
Conor Houghton 61 Forester Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QB S 07/02/2017: As a neighbour of the pools I am very keen on this application; in addition to expanding Bath's unique tourist offering it will provide a new community focus for our neighbourhood and it will encourage more intense use of the river, adding liveliness to the riverscape. 07/02/2017
Julie Beale 7 Seymour Road, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DY S 18/12/2016: Please make this happen. It will be so wonderful for our communities' teenagers to have somewhere healthy and outdoors to meet and socialise. Bath is such an historic city, let's add to this by helping to renovate the oldest surviving outdoor swimming place in the UK in one of the most beautiful cities in Britain. 18/12/2016: Please make this happen. It will be so wonderful for our communities' teenagers to have somewhere healthy and outdoors to meet and socialise. Bath is such an historic city, let's add to this by helping to renovate the oldest surviving outdoor swimming place in the UK in one of the most beautiful cities in Britain. 18/12/2016
Eliza Solesbury Owl House, High Street, Woolley, Bath, BA1 8AT, S 18/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support this application. The pools are an amazing asset to Bath which we must not loose. Outdoor pools are thin on the ground and provide an amazing facility to residents and visitors alike, there are none in bath like this however Briastol and Portishead have lidos that are always full, so it would be great to see Bath have a place like this of its own. The people involved have worked tirelessly to raise awareness and get the pools restored and saved from further delapidation. I strongly belive this is a great oppurtunity to restore a beautiful precious site. 18/12/2016
Fernando Romero 73 Ballance Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2RR S 18/12/2016: Support heartily the application to keep our heritage alive for many generations to come and for my children, grandchildren and future descendants to enjoy this treasure and be in contact with nature 18/12/2016
Alan Robinson 5 Raby Place, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4EH S 18/12/2016: our family very much supports this application as seeking to preserve some important heritage, as creating an amenity for local residents and as adding to the attraction of Bath for visitors 18/12/2016
George Riley Dolphin House, 8 Northend, Batheaston, Bath, BA1 7EN, S 18/12/2016: An original pool, and a useable asset for all. A great project. 18/12/2016
Nicola Court 26 Archers, CM19 5SH S 18/12/2016: What a wonderful opportunity to restore this facility ... 18/12/2016
Susan Collins The Folly, 22 Wells Road, Westfield, BA3 3RH, S 18/12/2016: This is a wonderful opportunity to restore and bring back in to use a fabulous building which will be an asset to the community and city 18/12/2016
Justine Toye 147 Victoria Road, Dartmouth, TQ6 9EF S 18/12/2016: I will be moving back to Bath this year and would love the Cleveland outdoor pool to be open again. It was always such a fun facility - and safer than swimming in the river near Limpley Stoke. 18/12/2016
Gillian Bebber Avon Cottage, 22 Church Street, Bathford, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7TU S 18/12/2016: I support the application 18/12/2016
Sharon White 14 Rose Hill, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SZ S 18/12/2016: As a child I spent many happy days at the Cleveland Baths. The resurgence in these facilities nationally is a great step forward and I hope BANES Council will understand what a great asset this would be to the City for residents and visitors alike. 18/12/2016
Bryan Chalker 57 Quarry Rock Gardens, Claverton Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6EG S 18/12/2016: It is vital that this scheme goes forward as quickly as possible. The Cleveland Bath restoration will help to ensure that this City retains its World Heritage Status and boosts tourist figures. It is also an important part of Britain's heritage, so please get on with it! 18/12/2016
Peter Fox 28 Edna Road, London, SW20 8BT, S 13/12/2016: I support this application and would be happy to see a functioning historic baths again. 14/12/2016
Richard Catterill 2 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QN S 14/12/2016: Will be an asset to the community and a worthwhile restoration of a historical feature in Bath. 14/12/2016
J Fenton-Springer 5 Redland Park, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1SL S 14/12/2016: I am so excited that this gem will be brought back to life for the people of Bath and it's visitors! Great childhood memories. 14/12/2016
Tonia Hinds 21 Haycombe Drive, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1PG S 14/12/2016: I support getting bathes reopened 14/12/2016
Rachel 163D Catherine Way, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7PB S 14/12/2016: It would be so lovely to have this open again 14/12/2016
Harry Clark 40 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QW S 14/12/2016: I support the redevelopment of these delightful historic baths 14/12/2016
Richard Young 40 Brooklyn Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6TE S 14/12/2016: This is such an important project for Bath,. 14/12/2016
Joanna Archer 23 London Road East, Batheaston, BA1 7RL, S 14/12/2016: Congratulations to all the hard-working volunteers who have brought the Cleveland Pools this far. Looking forward to having a dip myself, soon. 14/12/2016
Julia Gecit Grooms Cottage , Station Road , Corsham , Wilts , SN13 9EZ , S 14/12/2016: This must be saved for all of us !
Locals and tourists !
14/12/2016
Julia Williams 1 Kennet Park, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6SS S 14/12/2016: What a fantastic plan. Total support 14/12/2016
Stefano Marazzi 41 Southlands Drive, Timsbury, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 0HB S 14/12/2016: A great idea!!! This will do wonders for outdoor leisure! 14/12/2016
Mary Sanford 6 Vellore Lane, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6JQ S 14/12/2016: Quite frankly I can't wait to swim at the pools, please make it happen, for the whole community. 14/12/2016
Claire Hitchen 50 Dorset Street, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3RA S 14/12/2016: Love to see this opened for bath to enjoy 14/12/2016
Hannah Tunstall 13 Eastbourne Avenue, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EW S 14/12/2016: I would love the pool to be restored for my family to enjoy. 14/12/2016
Ed Mason Wellsway, BA2 2TZ, S 14/12/2016: I support this 14/12/2016
Melanie Clarke 57 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QW S 14/12/2016: The restoration of the pools is a good thing for historical, cultural, and health reasons. This is a long time coming and I fully support this project. I am a local resident and a user of the pool when it was open briefly in the early eighties. I can remember the popularirity of it on a sunny day back then. I wish the group pushing for the reopening every success and they should be given as much support as needed to get this vision realised. 14/12/2016
Richard Pasco 131 Purlewent Drive, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4BE S 14/12/2016: Wonderful local resource that should be supported! 14/12/2016
Suzanna Symons 7 John Rennie Close, Bradford On Avon , Wilts, BA15 1UJ, S 14/12/2016: This will be a brilliant asset. I spent many happy summers at the baths and can't wait to bring my children. We need to preserve and update our heritage in this way to protect it forever. 14/12/2016
Tim Brooke 151 Catherine Way, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7PB S 14/12/2016: I think this lovely old lido should be restored - I am bath born and bred and spent many happy summers at this pool when growing up . It will be great for bath as it's adds to the spa aspect. 14/12/2016: I spent many summers at this pool in my childhood.it will be great to see it open to the public again. 14/12/2016
Michael Elliott 5 Holburne Place, Henrietta Road, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 6LY, S 18/12/2016: This project has the potential to return an historic building in Bath's heritage centre to sustainable use for Bath residents and visitors alike. Clearly the transport scheme has had careful consideration and I believe is viable. Walking, cycle, public transport and river access to the site are all sensible options and there is a small amount of disability parking nearby.
I support the scheme overall with its Lottery funding bringing monies into the city for resident and tourism benefits.
18/12/2016
Su Hart 4 Thomas Street, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5NW S 18/12/2016: 100%support for this project.
A great thing for locals and tourists and in line with the cultural and historic profile of the city. This is the only Georgian lido left in the country and Bath is lucky enough have it. A great asset a beautiful and tranquil place in the city and to get there by green transport ...bicycle...or by foot can be see as another plus. Clearly a lot of belief and public support has been behind this project for years from residents of the city.
18/12/2016
Chris Rogers Lyncombe Court, Lyncombe Vale Road, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4LR S 18/12/2016: This application to restore one of our city's landmark public buildings has my full support and I encourage you to approve it. 18/12/2016
Roger Clifton 20 Southcot Place, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4PE S 18/12/2016: I fully support the proposals for the Cleveland Pools 18/12/2016
Peter Snadden 5 Hanover Street, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6PP S 18/12/2016: Great scheme ! 18/12/2016
Mike Taylor 8 Beckford Gardens, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QU S 18/12/2016: Support the restoration and use of Cleveland Pools wholeheartedly - will be a fantastic attraction for local and visitors alike. Impressed with how inclusive and open the team leading the development have been with local residents (we live within about 200m of the entrance). I am sure the actual development will require some disruption to allow materials etc to be transported into site, but well worth the temporary inconvenience. I would assume should traffic become problematic, the residents parking scheme can be extended into Sundays and drop offs encouraged slightly further away from the site. 18/12/2016
Jane 3 Hanover Street, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6PP S 18/12/2016: An asset to Bath open to all and accessible by foot and water. 18/12/2016
L Morgan 81 London Road West, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7JE S 18/12/2016: I fully support the restoration of the Cleveland Pools. As an interesting & significant part of the social history of Bath, the Pools deserve the care and attention a restoration will provide, while their potential as a wonderful facility for the local & wider Bath community - now and in the future - is incredibly exciting.
18/12/2016
Chaya Tagore Flat 49 Clarkson House, 7 Great Stanhope Street, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2BQ S 18/12/2016: I visited Cleveland Pools several years ago as part of a Heritage Week Open day event. On that day, there were lots of people talking about their fond memories of swimming there as young children or with their own children. I'm delighted to learn that the Pools will re-open (I currently enjoy in Wild Swimming at Farleigh Hungerford) and as a local Bath resident feel it is really important that this community project goes ahead. 18/12/2016
M Chapman 3 Hanover Street, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6PP S 18/12/2016: An essential addition to a Georgian town particularly as the baths are unique. 18/12/2016
Dr Roberta Anderson 4 Penn Close, Wells, BA5 3JQ S 18/12/2016: This is an amazing project to restore the only remaining 18th c outside lido. Don't let them down. 18/12/2016
Antony Kear Woodview , 54A Gloucester Rd North, Filton , Bristol, BS7 0SJ S 18/12/2016: I think this should be done 18/12/2016
Claire 152A Swiss Drive,, Ashton Vale, Bristol, BS3 2RP, S 18/12/2016: Former bath resident and frequent visitor, and I fully support this application. 18/12/2016
James Coyle 2 The Moorings, Sydney Wharf, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4AZ S 18/12/2016: It would be a great facility for Bath and no doubt it would be very well used. 18/12/2016
Brian Popay 42 Somerset Rd, Frome, BA11 1HE S 18/12/2016: I used the Baths in the 1970s and found them to be a marvellous facility.
It would be great to see them in use again providing a much needed addition to the town.
18/12/2016
Ian Tomlinson 35 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QW S 18/12/2016: A fantastic addtion to the attractions in Bath 18/12/2016
Mrs Eileen Anderton Flat 11, Rosenberg House, Westgate Buildings, City Centre, Bath, BA1 1SP, S 18/12/2016: During the Sixties and Seventies I had a season ticket for Cleveland Baths and took my children often. I would meet friends there and we all enjoyed happy days, having packed lunches on the grass and making use of both pools. We were all very unhappy when the Pool was closed.
I fully support the application for the restoration and future use of the Pool. I cannot imagine that Bath and N.E Somerset Planning Committee would turn down this application - Bath should be proud to be the home of such an historic bathing place.
18/12/2016
Gillian Kelly 21 Larkhall Place, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SF S 18/12/2016: I support this sensitive and thoughtful restoration proposal and am keen to see the project completed as soon as possible. I remember swimming here until it closed and really look forward to swimming there regularly again. 18/12/2016
Paul Hollin 11 Eden Terrace, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6TQ S 18/12/2016: A very important facility for Bath. 18/12/2016
Iris Shanahan 11 Summerlays Place, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4HN S 18/12/2016: I heartily support the application and feel that Bath is very lucky to have such an amenity available. Too often such things are allowed to disappear and are later regretted. As a Liverpudlian Iknow I regret the removal of the overhead railway. 18/12/2016: I heartily support the application and feel that Bath is very lucky to have such an amenity available. Too often such things are allowed to disappear and are later regretted. As a Liverpudlian Iknow I regret the removal of the overhead railway. 18/12/2016
Maxine Smith 28 Pitman Court, Gloucester Road, Swainswick, Bath, BA1 8BD, S 18/12/2016: I support this application for the following reasons:
1. The historical significance to Bath with respect to public, open air bathing and its contribution within the World Heritage Site.
2. The positive addition of a lido facility for all Bath and surrounding area residents.

I would like to comment on the 'Travel Plan', part of the application documents:
A pedestrian footbridge linking the public footpath beside Cleveland Pools with Kensington Meadows on the opposite bank of the River Avon would be useful and could ease traffic congestion along the London Rd. The footbridge would link with the Bathwick estate, enabling direct shopping access to London Road, thus avoiding the need for journeys with vehicles. This ties in with the associated green travel plan, which will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car.
18/12/2016
Bathwick Estate Residents Association C/o Charles Draper 5 Forester Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QF O 18/12/2016: I am objecting on behalf of the Bathwick Estate Residents Association. The Cleveland Pools are within the area of our Association. We, like almost everyone involved, would like to see the pools restored, but not at an unacceptable cost to the local community.

The CPT had been assiduous in publicising their aims and plans in the local community, but has not recognised that the impact on immediate neighbours was likely to be a significant constraint that needed to be built in from the start. The CPT only revealed the impact of their business plans on the local community in October, and since then have said they had no scope to negotiate on them. The current proposals envisage the pools being open in the summer months up to 7 days a week, at times ranging from 7am to 9pm. The CPT envisage visitor numbers rising to 36,000 by year 3. Substantial numbers will choose to be delivered by car even if they cannot park. The so-called travel plan in the application is a more a statement of the problem than a solution to it. The Bathwick Estate, and particularly this end of it, is a very quiet residential area, with no through traffic.

We object to the current development plans because they are predicated on a business plan that would have an unacceptable impact on our community. In particular, there has been a lack of local engagement, the plans would cause noise/disturbance to the community and would impact on existing occupants at the expense of future visitors.


Section 7; 66 of the Planning Act 1990 states that “Applicants will be expected to work closely with those directly affected by their proposals to evolve designs that take account of the views of the community.”

Saved Local Plan Policy D.2 Design and Public Realm Considerations, in particular criterion F which states that:
“Development will only be permitted if: ...
f) the proposed development will not cause significant harm to the amenities of existing or proposed occupiers of, or visitors to, residential or other sensitive premises by reason of loss of light, or increased overlooking, noise, smell, traffic or other disturbance.”

National Planning Policy Framework, as set out at paragraph 17, which provides that planning should:
“always seek to secure high quality design and a good standard of amenity for all existing and future occupants of land and buildings.”

We think the only viable way forward is for the Council to become much more closely involved with the steering and direction of this project, with full involvement of local residents, and starting with a facilitated review of the local impact of the business plan assumptions behind the current proposals, with the intention of finding an acceptable compromise. This would require give and take on all sides.



18/12/2016
Amie Berkovitch 29 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 18/12/2016: I have long been a supporter of the restoration of the Cleveland Pools, living only a short distance from the site. It is therefore with regret that I must write in strong objection to the current proposal which has failed, despite months of fervent campaigning on the part of local residents, to take into account the impact the current proposal will have on its locality. I believe that the proposal in its current form fails on a number of key planning policies cited below and until these have been addressed (and the project integrated into the life of the existing community without the detriment it currently has), should be rejected by B&NES.

There has been no local engagement in the development of the plans. Attempts at local engagement have been declined and ignored by the CPT. This is contrary to:

Section 7; 66 of the Planning Act 1990 states that “Applicants will be expected to work closely with those directly affected by their proposals to evolve designs that take account of the views of the community.”

The current proposed opening hours and plans for private functions will have great noise disturbance to the community in particular an area with a dense community of young families serving Bathwick St Mary, Widcombe and other local primary schools. The acoustics of this river valley mean that any noise in the evening transmits a long way - from people's garden, Kensington meadows - it is a sensitive noise area. On hot summer nights when children sleep with windows open, how is a young child expected to sleep with revelry going on at the Pools until 9pm? Later for events. The venue will not have a licence to sell alcohol but what prevents private hire from bringing alcohol to the premises (as for every community venue in Bath?). This noise / disturbance factor has not been considered although raised to the CPT many times. It is contrary to:

Saved Local Plan Policy D.2 Design and Public Realm Considerations, in particular criterion F which states that:
“Development will only be permitted if: ...
f) the proposed development will not cause significant harm to the amenities of existing or proposed occupiers of, or visitors to, residential or other sensitive premises by reason of loss of light, or increased overlooking, noise, smell, traffic or other disturbance.”

Finally, the impact on existing occupants / neighbours / the immediate community of the Bathwick Estate at the expense of future visitors has not been weighed. Not a few, but considerable numbers of the immediate residents, the very people who have supported the concept of the Pools restoration, have been summarily ignored in order to press on with a business plan that will detrimentally affect their residential amenity. It is thus contrary to:

National Planning Policy Framework, as set out at paragraph 17, which provides that planning should:
“always seek to secure high quality design and a good standard of amenity for all existing and future occupants of land and buildings.”

The Cleveland Pools is an important and highly desired heritage asset and we all wish it to succeed. I do not believe the current proposal will enable this to happen. It requires re-thinking and local community engagement; a revised version of the business plan, opening hours, private hire, other revenue streams such as merchandising and re-thinking of the transit of visitors / Green Plan. This is not an impossible task but it requires the will of those leading the project to find a better way forward in conjunction with the community which is home to this unique and important facility.
18/12/2016
Jane Carless 36 Brassmill Lane, Newbridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3JE S 18/12/2016: Will be a great benefit for Bath. 18/12/2016
Katherine Hann 5 Clevedon Lane, Bristol, BS20 7RG S 18/12/2016: The pools need to be brought back in to use to have a viable future for this important heritage. 18/12/2016
Rebecca Du Pontet 77 Lower Oldfield Park, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3HR S 18/12/2016: I fully support this application - it would be absolutely wonderful to see the pool restored to its former glory and once again used by Bath residents and visitors. I am very excited about the proposed renovation and commend all those who have worked tirelessly to raise the huge funds required to make this dream a possibility. 18/12/2016
Charlotte Moar Madeley House, Lansdown Road, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5SU S 18/12/2016: I support the application which I am sure will add huge value to Bath and bring back to life beautiful old buildings in a sympathetic way. 18/12/2016
Adam Warfield 123 Bay Tree Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NF S 18/12/2016: Clevedon Baths as well as being a historically important site holds fond childhood memories. I always remember it as a 'Happy Place' for me growing up in the area and I'm sure would continue to do so for many generations to come if returned to its former glory. I walk my dogs in Kensington Meadows and always smile when I see it through the trees - although seeing it deteriorate over the intervening years has seemed such a shame. 18/12/2016
Carolyn Shirley 19 St Catherine's Close, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6BS S 18/12/2016: The plans provide for a community amenity that will be valued by many. 18/12/2016
B Gascoigne 13 Forester Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QF S 18/12/2016: This vital historic pool must be kept and restored for us and for the future. 18/12/2016
Richard Saltet Not Given S 18/12/2016: I support this important facility. 18/12/2016: I support this important facility. 18/12/2016
Jessica Wharton 2 East End Cottages, East End, Chewton Mendip, BA3 4LX S 18/12/2016: Having grown up in Bath and as a former swimmer at the Cleveland Baths, I'm hopeful that following a 10-year plan to renovate the Baths that full planning will now be granted. It will be bringing back an outdoor pool with its adjoining building and facilities into use. Visitors to the pool will be encouraged to arrive on foot, by bike or public transport. It will be another exceptional asset to the City of Bath and I can see no reason why planning should not be granted. 18/12/2016
Nigel Green Flat 3, Heanton Close,, Higher Park Road,, Braunton,, Devon., EX33 2NZ S 18/12/2016: The Cleveland Baths should be fully restored. They offer a Community facility that was once enjoyed by many. Some things are best confined to The Dustbin. The Cleveland Baths should not. 18/12/2016
Julie Skailes 19 Second Avenue, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3NN S 18/12/2016: I support this application as the Pools are part of Bath's heritage. It will enhance the community, maintain a listed building and offer other businesses in the area, such as the Boating Station, a chance for more business. 18/12/2016
Jemima Buoy 248 Overndale Road, Bristol, BS16 2RG S 18/12/2016: A wonderful idea to restore the lido for Bath and preserving/restoring a Victorian must-do for the modern day. 18/12/2016
Margaret McQueen 2 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 18/12/2016: I am opposed to this development as it is far too big and commercial for what is a quiet residential area with no parking and no through roads. The amount of traffic it will create from customers and deliveries etc. not to mention the noise from the open air pool usage will be awful. The noise from the pool area during the few events that have been put on there I have found disturbing as the sound carries up to the back of the Hampton Row and other houses here and echoes off the walls.Even people just chatting can be clearly heard and has sometimes waked me from sleep. The volume of visitors that the development needs will change the neighbourhood drastically and it will no longer be a safe environment for local children to play outside as they presently do. This does not seem to me to be a restoration as much of the original old pool environs are to be obliterated and large unsightly buildings erected to cope with the "hoped for" huge amount of customers. The character of a wide area around the pools will be completely changed because of the amount destruction that will be necessary to implement this scheme. I am referring to the removal and/or severe coppicing of the vast majority of the areas lovely mature trees.I hope you will consider how unpleasant and irreversible all this will be and the detrimental effect it will have on the local residents nearby and over most of the Bathwick estate as a whole. Yours, M.McQueen. 18/12/2016
Elizabeth Louise Wallace 4 - 5 Canal Terrace, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6TP S 18/12/2016: • It involves the restoration and re-use of a Grade II* historic gem that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register;
• A sympathetic and thoughtful restoration is proposed, as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
• It's the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815);
• Renovation and interpretation will tell the extraordinary story of the Pools;
• It will be a community facility for residents and visitors alike;
• It’s identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
• The original ladies’ pool will be highlighted as part of a ‘Learning Centre’;
• A “green travel plan” will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car;
• There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents.
18/12/2016
David Hooper 11 Bathwick Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6NX S 18/12/2016: I think it will be fantastic to see this building reconstructed. Not only will it preserve part of the heritage of Bath but also provide an attraction that is unique to the nation. I fully support this planning application. 18/12/2016
Isabelle Selley 41 Cranwells Park, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2YE S 18/12/2016: I support the application 18/12/2016
Tim West 51 Coronation Avenue, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2JU S View Associated Documents 18/12/2016
Dr Elizabeth Jones Brynderw, 16 Wellfield Road, Carmarthen, SA31 1DS S 18/12/2016: I am now 58 years old and would love to swim in the open air at Cleveland.Please make this possible by approving the planning permission .It wouls be another feather in Baths hat 18/12/2016
Matthew Rowe 35 Cranwells Park, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2YE S 18/12/2016: This is a great project to restore part of Bath's history, and preserve it from dereliction. It is sad to see so many lidos fall into ruin, and I am sure this will be a project of which the city will be proud. It is entirely in keeping with Bath's reputation for being a city which is proud of its heritage.

The fact that the pools will be open to the public to use as an outdoor pool is an added bonus. Rather than being a museum to be looked at, it will be a facility that can be used as it was originally intended.
18/12/2016
Zoe Hughes Gough 111 Lower Oldfield Park, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3HR S 19/12/2016: This project represents a wonderful example of community spirit. Preserving and reviving this important piece of English heritage for public use is a commendable achievement. I wholeheartedly support this application for planning permission. 19/12/2016
Nikki Ruck 41 Eastbourne Avenue, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EN S 19/12/2016: I strongly support the renovation of the pools. 19/12/2016
Vicky Gallop Garden Flat , 41 Park Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2TD S 19/12/2016: As a cyclist and a lover of Baths' historic heritage I totally support this project and those who have care of it because:
It involves the restoration and re-use of a Grade II* historic gem that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register; so NEEDS to be done
A sympathetic and thoughtful restoration is proposed, as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
It's the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815); UNIQUE for Bath
Renovation and interpretation will tell the extraordinary story of the Pools;
It will be a community facility for residents and visitors alike;
It’s identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
The original ladies’ pool will be highlighted as part of a ‘Learning Centre’;
A “green travel plan” will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car; looks to the FUTURE
There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents
Thank you
Vicky
19/12/2016
Frances Anderton 2807 Highland Ave, #3, Santa Monica, California 90405, 90405-4524 S 19/12/2016: I grew up in Bath and spent many happy summers swimming at Cleveland Baths. It is a tragedy that the pool ceased to be accessible to Bathonians, not to mention visitors to the city. How marvelous that in addition to its Georgian residential treasures the city also boasts a swimming pool from the period! It is imperative the pool be reopened and I totally this planning application. 19/12/2016
Sara Dixon 19 Whitehall Grove , Lincoln , LN1 1PG S 19/12/2016: My whole family have enjoyed swimming at the pools for generations. I hope my boys will have the opportunity to do the same. This is a unique asset for the city of Bath. It falls in well with the history and the regeneration of the thermal spas and the view of Bath as a center of health, relaxation and sociability The ideal that the pools will be available to everyone just as they have always been should be celebrated, unlike many lido's which have gone into private members hands, therfore pricing many of the community out. I had the privilege of swimming in the roman baths a long time ago and opening the pools again would give that same feeling of connection with our past. 19/12/2016
Barry Coles 7 Bell Close, Farmborough, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 0AP S 19/12/2016: I support the application for the restoration of this amazing heritage site. It will be such an asset for the City. 19/12/2016
Chris Godfrey 52 Solsbury Way, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6HJ S 19/12/2016: As a world heritage site and living in a city inheritably associated with bathing, I think it is essential that the council grants planning permission for the sympathetic restoration of these magnificent Georgian baths. 19/12/2016
Mrs Louise Kelly 166 Bradford Road, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5BZ S 19/12/2016: I feel strongly that this application should be approved. Apart from becoming a facility for all residents, the building is of historical, architectural and emotional importance to so many Bathonians. 19/12/2016
Alexis Prior 41 Granville Road, Lansdown, Bath, BA1 9DN, S 19/12/2016: Not only is this an important historic building, but as a natural health practitioner I would be recommending outdoor/wild swimming to my clients as it is known to not only provide exercise, but also to boost mood, giving the swimmer a feeling of euphoria - how brilliant! Here's an interesting clip from the BBC programme, The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p047z13f
19/12/2016
Angelika Sesterheim Byefields, Henley Lane, Box Corsham, SN13 8EL S 19/12/2016: It would be a real pity not to restore the oldest outdoor pool in the UK - and especially in Bath as a World Heritage City!!!! 19/12/2016
Alan Langton Green Valley, Lyncombe Vale Road, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4LP S 19/12/2016: This project has my full support. Its many heritage benefits are well set out with the application. I would like to add further support stemming from the scheme's contribution to Bath's attractions for residents and visitors. It should be seen as a fitting addition to the spas, Roman Baths, fine museums, theatres, churches, festivals, universities and sports venues , not to mention of course the architecture, history and, yes, retailing and eateries. The Planning Authority should not merely approve this application but be positively helpful in every way properly open to it. 19/12/2016
Alan Rowell Ashleigh, Perrymead, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5AX S 19/12/2016: As a member of Bath Preservation Trust and a Bath resident I fully support this long awaited application. It is a significant step in preservation in its own right of this historic gem, and in providing amenity to the City. This will enhance Bath's reputation as a World Heritage City and as a spa town. 19/12/2016
Steven Faragher 84 Meadow Park, Bathford, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7PY S 19/12/2016: This is an outstanding application that deserves the council's full support. Watching the campaign to resurrect the Cleveland Pools has been one of the highlights of living in Bath for the last ten years and it would be a terrible shame if it all came t nothing. 19/12/2016
Sue Pickering 28 Lorne Road, Westmoreland, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3BY S 19/12/2016: This would be a valuable addition to the economy of Bath, and would preserve a unique building. 19/12/2016
Bruno Bubna-Kasteliz Hatfield Place, Hatfield Road, Bloomfield, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2BD S 19/12/2016: I believe that the planned repair and upgrading should be supported in view of its significant historical and social place in the city of Bath. 19/12/2016
Amanda Salter 15 Alexandra Place, , Staple Hill, BS16 4QL S 19/12/2016: Great opportunity to restore this historically important site. 19/12/2016
Vicky Edwards 3 Rochfort Place, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6PB S 19/12/2016: I definitely support this project for the following reasons:
- It utilises an otherwise unused building and grounds
- The project will return something of historical interest to its original use; adding to the character of Bath
- The pools will provide a unique facility to Bath; good for tourism
- The pools will provide a unique facility to provide enjoyement to the local community
- The pools encourage outdoor, active and sociable leisure-time; good for health and community
19/12/2016
Claire Jackson 3 Woodland Place, Bathwick Hill, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6EH S 19/12/2016: I would like to support the application on the grounds of a very important new community facility that will promote swimming and provide a fantastic facility for local people. The green travel plan is important and the location well placed to enable a range of green travel to be used. Opportunities for out-door swimming are very limited locally and the wild swimming at Claverton is not safe for those who are not confident swimmers.

In addition it will enhance the world heritage city through the restoration of this very important facility in sympathy with the rest of the City.
19/12/2016
Sara Iles Arborfield, Holcombe Hill, Holcombe, Radstock , BA3 5DN S 19/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support the restoration and redevelopment of this building and public facility. 19/12/2016
Kim De Morgan 41 Sydney Buildings, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6DB S 19/12/2016: Fabulous project to save a vital piece of Bath history and swimming for the community in such a gorgeous setting . 19/12/2016
Jemma Bartholomew 20 Horseshoe Walk, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6DE S 19/12/2016: I support this application.
I think it incredibly important that listed buildings on the Buildings at Risk register are sympathetically restored rather than left to ruin. I love outdoor swimming and am really looking forward to being able to do that in such historic surroundings, a mere 20 mins walk from my house.


19/12/2016
Rachel Irons 11 Belgrave Place, Camden Road, Beacon Hill, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5JB S 19/12/2016:
As the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815); this is a unique site and is an important restoration project that deserves the funding.
19/12/2016
Heather Watts Flat 6, Quay Point , Lime Kiln Road, Bristol, BS1 5AD S 19/12/2016: The heritage of this site is very important in terms of our culture and in terms of the health and well-being of Bath residents. The site is unique due to its tranquil location, even though it is very close to the centre of a major tourist city. Sites such as this need to be on the tourist map. The location itself is close to the already popular Kennet and Avon Canal. I look forward to the opportunity to swim in this outdoor pool that is within fifteen miles of my home. 19/12/2016
Charlie Arnold & Barbara Roglin-Arnold 55 Stonehouse Lane, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5DW S 19/12/2016: This restoration would be a wonderful addition to "Historic Bath". Could make a wonderful place to relax and exercise for all the families in these hectic times. 19/12/2016
Ben Stott 55 Purnell Way, Paulton, Bristol, BS39 7AB, S 19/12/2016: I support the restoring of the Cleveland pools. It will connect people with the past and bring something unique for future generations to enjoy in Bath. 19/12/2016
Jay Selley 11 Windsor Castle, Upper Bristol Road, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3DN S 19/12/2016: I think this is an excellent proposal which will safeguard the future of this truly unique pool -a currently 'at risk' building that is recognised as one of Bath's assets contributing to the city's Outstanding Universal Value. I think it will be visited by visitors and locals alike and I am looking forward to it's opening. 19/12/2016
Laura Battley 122 Rosewell Court, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2AH O 20/12/2016: These plans don't appear to have anything to do with restoration: quite the opposite! All pre-1900 structures will be destroyed, in fact.

Then there's the destruction of habitats created by chopping down mature trees. These plans are environmentally unsound! Possibly illegal, even? If there are bats etc nesting in those trees. And this is in aid of building a toilet block that will look dreadful: currently that stretch of river is beautiful, enjoyed by humans and wild-life. An 8 metre long toilet block isn't exactly the kind of eyesore that visitors and residents of our beautiful city should have to see on a peaceful river trip.

Speaking about peace, that is the final complaint about these plans I'm going to make. They are clearly designed not with restoration in mind, but to make money by funneling in as many tourists as possible during the sunny season. It doesn't look like adequate parking has been provided. It doesn't look like adequate parking could be provided, even! And what about the disruption to local residents caused by all of that extra traffic?

Bath is supposed to be tasteful and subtle. These plans are anything but.

20/12/2016
Stephen Lewis 13 Marconi Road, , Portishead, , North Somerset, BS20 8DE S 19/12/2016: I fully support the application as it brings a superb facility to a superb city. 19/12/2016
Claire Smith 14 Upper Camden Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5HX S 20/12/2016: what a brilliant asset for the city! I love this project 20/12/2016
Julie Platt 15 Lower Camden Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5JJ S 19/12/2016: This is a fantastic opportunity for Bath. Not only will it enhance what the city can offer to tourists but the restored baths will be an amazing resource for residents. The success of the lido in Bristol and many other lidos that are reopening all over the UK should be an indication of the revival of open air swimming. The Cleveland Pools are unique in terms of their historical significance and they are also incredibly elegant, atmospheric and beautiful. B&NES council should embrace this opportunity wholeheartedly. There are many bits of historic Bath that are gradually disappearing - ghost signs, old buildings being demolished. This is a wonderful chance to preserve and enhance part of Bath's extraordinary heritage. 19/12/2016
Lewis Stewart 15 Weare Court, Canada Way, Bristol, BS1 6XF, S 19/12/2016: Cleveland Pools is the country's oldest outdoors swimming pool; as such it is unique and an overlooked but important part of Bath's history and heritage. With its restoration complete it will be a cultural and educational asset to the community and city, as well as a leisure facility. Cleveland Pools Trust's detailed, costed and environmentally sound plan is vital to restore this secluded beauty spot within easy reach of the city centre. The restoration has been met with approval by Historic England and backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Please give the go ahead by approving planning permission, and enable this lovely site to return to its rightful place as an attraction for local residents and visitors alike. 19/12/2016
Jim Dowling 19 Sion Hill, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2UJ S 19/12/2016: I have hoped that one day Bath will again have a public open air swimming pool. We should thank all those who have been involved in trying to make this happen. 19/12/2016
David Luddington 2 The Gardens, , Hillesley, , Wotton Under Edge, GL127RE, S 19/12/2016: It is hugely important that this project is supported by the council. 19/12/2016
Sue Craig 21 Victoria Buildings, Westmoreland, Bath, BA2 3EH, S 19/12/2016: Cleveland Pools played a big part in my childhood and I would be so pleased to see them back in use. I also believe that they would help to improve the overall neighbourhood. Hampton Row has sadly become quite neglected - especially at the end where the bridge is - I'm sure a restored and thriving feature like this would help to bring it back to its former glory 19/12/2016
Haf Morgan 23 Alexandra Road, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4PW, O 19/12/2016: I strongly object to this application.
Please contact me to discuss my objections.
This planning application belittles the excellent balance that other historic sites in Bath have achieved in preserving architectural factuality and providing accessibility as a visitor attraction.
This application will irrevocably change the whole of the Bathwick estate, and the lives of the residents in that area.
Hâf Morgan
19/12/2016
Jenny Woodhouse 23 Highland Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1DY S 20/12/2016: This pool is a historic site within this World Heritage Site. It would be worth restoring it merely for its own sake - the earliest open air swimming facility in the country, which is located in a beautiful setting. More than that, restored to use it would provide Bath with an open-air pool. This is a facility which would be valued by residents (many of whom remember with pleasure using it before its closure) and also by visitors. To a greater extent than for most British towns Bath's economy depends on tourism and the restoration of the pool would benefit the economy. 20/12/2016
Ed Grattan 3 Daniel Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6NB S 05/01/2017: It looks like a fantastic project. These things should be supported, particularly to support and show off the beauty of Bath. I do hope it can go ahead as planned! 05/01/2017
Lindsay Birt 28 Lower Whitelands, Radstock, Bath And North East Somerset, BA3 3JW S 19/12/2016: Considering the beautiful city of Bath was founded on waters we have a dearth of outdoor swimming opportunities. Please restore this glorious building so we locals, and the tourists, can bathe there again. 19/12/2016
Steve Henwood 5 Cleveland Row, Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QR O 20/12/2016: The committee will I hope excuse the emotive tone of this letter. I’m not a PR man paid comfortably with lottery money: on the contrary I am a long-time resident of this street and I have good reason to believe that this plan is going to be a major disruption to my domestic life.

My name is Steve
I live at – from the way I read the map – the nearest house to Cleveland Pools. I sleep in a room a few metres up overlooking (actually the important bit is ‘overhearing’) the site. I’ve lived here for 24 years (back when a retired Council officer was apparently trying to make a business out of it) and have always taken a keen interest in the site. I’m not the n.i.m.b.y. that you might think. I have supported the project of making use of the site, even donated to the odd appeal, signed up to a mailing list for more information, gone to open days, talked to volunteers, all in the cause of finding some appropriate use for this intriguing cluster of buildings.

Information in much detail has never, unfortunately, been forthcoming. Perhaps if I’d gone to meetings of their little group: but there are only so many little groups one can usefully be in and I do my bit elsewhere. And now it seems the Great & Good of the Cleveland Pools Trust are rewarding my feeble support by shattering the calm of our little cul-de-sac. A few drawings under a gazebo in town, some vague assurances, and suddenly: this. A multi-million pound business with four figures of visitors a week. The developers may have been legally obliged to assess the impact of their development on the wildlife, even take appropriate measures, but apparently no such duty attaches to discussing what impact their plans might have on their human neighbours. It’s not as if they didn’t know where to find us. Even Railtrack has been more communicative. So this then becomes your job.

This plan is for a business whose size is unsuited to the site. The access to the site is extremely poor, very little thought has been given to how their thousands of customers will arrive and depart, and what thought there has been is inadequate to the scale of the problem that the Trust themselves are creating.

Site access will of course be an issue from the moment building starts. The plans make no explanation of how the stacks of building materials will reach the site (not, we can assume, down the steep and narrow slope of the regular access) so we are left with disquieting suggestions from the project team such as that I will have a crane looming and working over my head for the duration of the work, that it will have to be situated on the green allotment gardens I can see out of my front window when I sit at my office desk – and, wouldn’t you know it, one of the allotments opposite the site entrance and so most suitable for whatever remodelling the crane and subsequent car-parking space require, is, by cruel coincidence, the one I work on myself with a couple of friends from just a little down the road.

1000 people a week for nearly half the year, rising to 1600 by year 3. Various fanciful figures are being bandied around: if we take one of the more conservative ones, that 20% of visitors won’t take the hint to walk, cycle, or bus it over here (a chunky 50% of visitors to the Trusts’ own Open Days, who were clearly informed there was no parking, still couldn;t manage to think of any other way to get here) then we have an additional 400 journeys a week (there being an arrival and a departure), rising to 640, down roads already rendered single-track by the parked cars on both sides (this is before pool-goers have tried – and I hope failed – to park themselves locally & illegally). Even at one every 5 minutes that’s a vast increase on the current frequency of more like one every 20 minutes, but they won’t be spread out, will they? There will be peak times when there are queues of traffic. There will be peak seasons. This will mean: no more local kids playing in the street, more pedestrians at risk from more car journeys, more people trying and failing to turn round at the end of the road (less room there because of recently granted planning permission, see below), a fog of exhaust fumes from idling engines. All in the cause of health and nostalgia, apparently.

Parking is something else that the plans seem vague about, but is certainly a material part of deciding whether this development is appropriate. Cycle parking too: great idea, except where are you going to put it? It is proposed (not detailed in the plan) to take an immense bite out of the earth bank that retains the allotments (that is if we disregard the suggestion that it would be more convenient simply to tarmac over the allotments for car parking and be done with it) and there will be cars dropping off people, and then when these have mobility problems, transferring them to some kind of motorised buggy and it’s off down the steep path to the pools (and of course, motor running high, back up the steep slope again afterwards). This will substitute for the birds, occasional allotment users, and trains deep in a cutting, which are currently the rather calmer vista from my office window. Oh, in case you’d forgotten the last bit of planning permission you agreed round here, all this in a narrow road at the end of which you recently agreed to add another 10 dwellings, most of which will doubtless feel hard done by if they can’t park the cars I’m sure they have to have down here too.

I used the word ‘office’ just now, you might think I’m being pretentious about my living room, but it’s where I work most days. I’m sure you’d all love months of building work outside and above your office window too, heavy loads swinging over your head as you leave your house. How inconvenient. Bound to be my fault for living here.

And then when the building’s finished, peace does not return to Cleveland Row. Far from it. From 7am we will have people arriving for their important early morning swim, and presumably someone opening up and starting the machines before that. Who wouldn’t want to be woken at 6.30 am. 7 days a week? (of course I’m wide awake by then and doing calisthenics in the garden). It’s just inconvenient that I habitually work late into the night. And doubly so that a good deal of my employment runs into the evening, and that I also work with organisations that meet in the evening for the convenience of people who work the accustomed hours. Most nights of the week I am not even home from work before 9 or 10 and it can just as easily be midnight or the small hours. But of course the lifestyle of those who fancy a swim at 7am trumps how I happen to earn my living. And am I not lucky to sleep in a room with a view which will hear any early morning noise on the site 30m away? I sleep at the back of the house because of the noise of the trains of course. Will the Trust be adding double glazing for me to their costs? I don’t expect so. Noise is an issue when it’s the nearest thing to your bedroom window every morning. Humans in general seem to need to emit noise to persuade themselves that they’re having a good time. And making a splash is such fun! Don’t even start me on swimming lessons or groups of kids or… And this is 96 hours a week. Dawn till dusk.

This project has been allowed to run away with itself under the momentum of plans made in no reference to the site beyond an outline on a map, and fuelled by consultants who profit from the project, through the weak leadership and management of what is claiming to be a community-based organisation. They are claiming to have ‘consulted’. This is a lie. They knew the actual neighbours would have something to say, so have tried to sideline us. CPT has come up with something greatly unsuitable for the site. Under 21st Century conditions & expectations this will be nothing like people’s cosy memories of the 1950s & ‘60s, nor could it ever be again. By their inability or unwillingness to discuss matters with those who will be most affected, CPT have further shown themselves inadequate managers and unworthy stewards of money that has come from the public. It really doesn’t bode well for the project: you the planners have the possibility of stopping a colossal waste of money as well as a mammoth disruption for its neighbours.

We’d still like to see the pools open - who wouldn’t? - but at a much lower level of intervention and technology, and consequently needing to be open for swimming only when the weather merits it, even leaving room for other uses of the intriguing buildings.
Don’t let yourselves be persuaded that it’s this or nothing, and especially don’t disregard the well-being of those of us who will have to live with this on our doorsteps. It’s very easy to “vote yes” if you think your own own well-being and lifestyle – in most cases more like just the idea of that – takes precedence over other people’s. It’s not so easy to live with it.
20/12/2016
Moira Prosser 63 Clobells, South Brent, Devon, TQ10 9JW S 19/12/2016: This is a fantastic project that has brought a great community of supporters together to bring something back that was lost to their local and wider community. It has great pull beyond the location and will enhance the tourist, cultural, educational,hospitality, portfolio that Bath offers alongside the vital health, well being and sport function that lies at its heart. It is a wonderful example of all that great connection and partnerships with the organisations that are guardians and custodians of our natural, social, health and historic heritage can achieve. The historic timeline and background to the project has a very unique dimension which demands attention and asks not to be neglected and left uninterpreted and unenhanced. The site has the capacity to capture the imagination and therefore offers great scope. It provides enormous opportunity for educational use at a low cost but with very high value as the site is very multi-dimensional and near to a number of educational settings.
I am really looking forward to a first swim in a lovely place resonating with social cultural history. Although I live in Devon I have already visited several times and am impressed by the planned, enhancement of the site for families, pool users and interested visitors. It will be a fantastic asset for families of young children in a Bath which is increasingly shop dense. It will provide another facility to be broadly but distinctly enjoyed. Cleveland Pools provides a backdrop for a whole variety of cultural, artistic and musical expression. This project is underpinned by a very strong unusual Trust vision that is distinctive in its creativity and engagement with a wide and inclusive range of groups and supporters. The project 's journey is an example to be admired in itself and points to a long and exciting future involvement with a wide community and providing plenty of opportunity for skills to be expressed. Support for this application is a recognition of the work already put in by all and a vote of confidence in Bath and local communities and social health!
19/12/2016
Lesley Woodman 91 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BW, S 19/12/2016: An invaluable part of Baths history 19/12/2016: An invaluable part of Baths history 19/12/2016
Tim Woodland 97 Queen's Drive, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5PD S 19/12/2016: Please allow this application. 19/12/2016
Emily Flat 5 Third Floor, 11 Bladud Buildings, City Centre, Bath, BA1 5LS, S 19/12/2016: Bath is constantly building new structures to look like old buildings. And now we have the chance to preserve and use an actual old building. Finally! 19/12/2016: Bath is constantly building new structures to look like old buildings. And now we have the chance to preserve and use an actual old building. Finally! 19/12/2016
Barbara Thatcher Kilkenny, , Beach Rd West, , Portishead, , Bristol , BS20 7HX S 19/12/2016: I think this is a brilliant opportunity to save another outdoor swimming pool and one with major historical significance, and I thoroughly support the application 19/12/2016
Mrs Jane Briggs Long Ridge, Summer Lane, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7EU S 20/12/2016: This unique Georgian Outdoor spa pool has to be restored to a usable condition. It is an important feature on the Avon which will enhance river usage and if not restored then what is its fate?
The buildings are listed and the site is within the Bath WHS and although there are practical difficulties with this site, access and parking etc they are not insoluble. Prior Park Landscape Garden has no general parking is difficult to access with steep climbs, steps etc but is a great success with the number of visitors annually increasing.
Ther |Council must have courage to encourage this project. remember the difficulties with Bath Spa thermal pools? They are now a great success for the city and visitors.The Cleveland pool is supported by enthusiastic and hard working volunteers who will ensure the make this project work. Go for it!
20/12/2016
Dr Jacqueline Hughes St Kilda, Beechen Cliff Road, Bear Flat, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4QT S 20/12/2016: I am in total support of this application. It involves the sympathetic and thoughtful restoration and re-use of a Grade II* historic gems (as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund), that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register. The Pool is the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815)
and the renovation and interpretation will tell the extraordinary story of the Pools. The Pool will be a community facility for residents and visitors. It is identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV). The original ladies’ pool will be highlighted as part of a ‘Learning Centre’ and a green travel plan will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car. There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents.
20/12/2016
Johanna Davies Valley View Barn, Upper Twinhoe, BATH, BA2 8QX S 19/12/2016: We hope that his valuable & exciting project goes ahead for both historical preservation purpose and community wellbeing. 19/12/2016
Joanna Haylock 9 Hampton Row, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QS O 20/12/2016: This planning application has not taken into account the massive impact it would have on local residents. With the proposed opening of up to 96 hours per week we must assume events other than swimming are being planned here, thus bringing noise and light pollution till 9pm plus the time it takes people to leave. Hampton Row is a narrow dead end street with often no turning space at the end, already on open days there have been cars with engines running backed up from one end of the street to the other.
The original use was as a cold water lido open in the summer months,this plan is a very far cry from that.
22/12/2016:
A £4M plan has the potential to cause harm, so surveys have been responsibly conducted on potential harm to trees, reptiles, buildings, fish, bats, archaeology, even the pondweed. But no studies have been done on the effect that the proposed large business development would have on the people, the community, the Bathwick Estate. The sense of community in Hampton Row and the adjoining streets is such that there has never been a need to form a Neighbourhood Watch. Children play in the road; residents look out for each other and socialise in the street. This is a conservation area. We request that a local impact assessment be carried out before any permissions are granted.

The historic parts of the Cleveland Pools still in existence are: the entrance gate & pillars; the stone steps down to the pools; the original Ladies’ Pool of 1817 – possibly the first in Britain - (although at present filled-in the pool is almost complete); the upper pool (built before1852); and the crescent of changing rooms.  This planning application seeks to: remove the gate & pillars for relocation by the river; to demolish the steps; to demolish the upper pool (breaking up the margins, and digging down through the floor); and to concrete over the ladies’ pool. All that would remain of the historic infrastructure of this entire unique complex would be the original crescent of buildings (the existing main pool was built by Bath Corporation in 1900).
The Cleveland Pools Trust’s literature talks a great deal about “heritage” - but their application seeks to remove, destroy or permanently conceal all pre-1900 structures apart from the crescent. BathNES Local Plan section BH.13 states ‘Development which adversely affects significant archaeological remains within Bath will not be permitted unless the preservation in situ of these remains can be achieved through a detailed design and construction scheme’
We object to the planned eradication of the irreplaceable historic fabric of the Cleveland Baths. 

One of the ‘functional’ new buildings proposed is an 8m wide toilet block on the riverbank, positioned ‘on the periphery of the site to minimise its visual impact on the….pools’. But this positioning will maximise its visual impact from the river. This large plain shed will have an 8 meter wide blank wall facing the river, the trees around it will either be cut down or pollarded . This handsome stretch of river bank is enjoyed by river traffic and walkers on Kensington Meadows and should not be blighted by the back of a toilet block (which would hide parts of the crescent from the river and river path).

The Cleveland Pools Trust seeks to restore the pools as an open air public swimming venue, with works paid for by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  One of the conditions to be met for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant is that the business created must be financially sustainable.  Solely as a result of that perceived need for profitability, business decisions have been taken which – if this plan were to be permitted in its present form – would result in a large commercial enterprise serving thousands of paying customers per week with a huge detrimental impact on the immediate neighbourhood.  The Bathwick Estate is a quiet cul-de-sac, a peaceful residential area. The planning permission sought is for a noisy open-air business, operating from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 o’clock at night, attracting 36,000 customers per year – mainly in high summer.  Such a large visitor attraction, with its attendant services – deliveries, refuse removal, etc., would change the entire character of the Estate, and the clamour from an open-air pool open for 96 hours/week would cause unacceptable noise pollution. 
The long-term vision of the BathNES Local Plan (section A2.5) is to ‘enhance the quality of life of local communities’.  This application, if permitted, would unarguably severely damage the local community’s quality of life.

Traffic volumes in the Bathwick Estate are very low, it being a residential cul-de-sac.  On the Cleveland Pools Trust’s “Open Days” (when visitors were specifically entreated not to come by car) approximately 40% of the visitors arrived in cars.  As a result, every “Open Day” needed two full-time stewards to manage the traffic attempting to turn round at the junction of Beckford Gardens and Rockliffe Avenue.  Residents fully expect that, should this inappropriate business be permitted, thousands of cars will enter the estate, stop, and do 3-point turns.  Air-pollution levels in the Bathwick Estate are already high due to its proximity to main roads.  This new business traffic into the Bathwick Estate would bring unacceptable levels of pollution, noise, and danger to playing children for 14 hours per day.

We had hoped that these much-anticipated plans would be for a modest return to use for the Pools which would include the preservation and display of the unique and atmospheric infrastructure. It is beyond disappointing that the plans submitted are so far from those desirable goals.
22/12/2016
John Davey 45 Rockliffe Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QW S 20/12/2016: The positives easily outweigh any negatives - bring back the pools 20/12/2016
Naomi Box 1 Quarrymans Court, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5HP O 20/12/2016: The plans do not take into account the local residents, the integrity of the history or the buildings and will ruin the view from the river. A more sensitive development could surely be accomplished. 20/12/2016
Hetty Dupays 12 Pera Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5NX S 20/12/2016: I fully support the restoration of Cleveland pools; it is part of the rich heritage bought through the natural hot springs around Bath and making the city the place to visit in the 1800's onward, for everyone seeking therapeutic treatments or simply relaxation. I personally remember swimming in the Pools when I was a child and when I returned there recently and it was a very evocative experience . I love to swim outdoors, usually in the River Avon at Warleigh Weir, which carries it's own risks, and if it was possible to walk down to Cleveland Pools every morning for a swim in such a beautiful setting alongside the river would be amazing; for me and many others locals as well as tourists.
Hetty Dupays
20/12/2016
Matthew Higgins 53 Marleys Way, BA11 3NG O 20/12/2016: I have been reliably informed that the plans which have been submitted do not do justice to the residents, the citizens of bath and the greater general public at large.
please see attached link to informed blog post :
http://eastboundoldways.blogspot.kr/2016/12/letter-from-residents.html

these plans are not in the interest of the residents and future users, they are a wolf in sheep's clothing and must be re-written.
20/12/2016
Rose Stevens Woodside, The Avenue, Claverton Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7AX S 20/12/2016: The pool is an historic site and an integral part of Bath's history 20/12/2016
Pablo Hernando The Old Manse, 22 High Street, Dilton Marsh , Westbury , BA13 4DS S 20/12/2016: The Cleveland Pools had been vandalised through the the years with the different uses that had been allowed to take place in this now Grade II and now on the Building at Risk register.
This is a great opportunity to put an end to the damage caused and bring this building back to what it was designed and built for.
20/12/2016
June Hannam 2 Malvern Villas, Camden Road, Beacon Hill, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5JS S 20/12/2016: I think the overall application to restore the pools is an excellent one. The lido is of historical importance and yet it can still be used by Bath residents and visitors. So a link between past and present. It will liven up that side of the city and can be linked with the main Spa. The idea of two pools- one especially for children is a good one. It is important these days too to have refreshment outlets. This has been very carefully planned with a focus on sustainable use and I am very supportive of the plan 20/12/2016
Mrs Pierrette Kirkup Weston Hill, Weston Park East, Upper Weston, Bath, BA1 2XA, S 20/12/2016: We must save this Georgian swimming pool which is unique in Britain.When my children were young we used to swim in the Cleveland Pools:a very refreshing experience in the open air. 20/12/2016
Jennie Regan 19 Holcombe Lane, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6UL O 20/12/2016: I welcome the idea of bringing the pools back in to public use and I have enjoyed visiting on heritage open days, however this needs to be done in a sensitive way.
I would be concerned about retaining the fabric of the historically important structures, ensuring that they are retained and restored sympathetically.
I would also be concerned about access to the site, this is within a quiet residential cul-de-sac with residents parking only and limited space for a bike storage area to encourage sustainable transport.
The introduction of a large toilet block on the river bank which floods would be a concern for health and visually intrusive from the river.
20/12/2016
Verity Baetke 52 Herbert Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3PP S 20/12/2016: The Cleveland Pools are a precious architectural gem, which would enhance the city and benefit tourists and local people alike. Bath's history and culture are defined by water, and this addition to local cultural heritage would add a new dimension. The Pools will be good for our environment, especially if access by boat can be made readily available. This would show Bath to be an innovative city and raise our profile regionally and nationally. Please allow this unique place to thrive again. 20/12/2016
Geraldine Palfreeman 40 Chilton Road, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DR S 20/12/2016: This is such an exciting and unique project. The plans are superb and as a resident of Bath of many years I fully support this application. 20/12/2016
Helen Grohmann 46 Ivy Avenue, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1AL S 20/12/2016: I am in support of the application to restore the Cleveland Pools because I consider it will provide an amazing facility for the community and local schools. The proposed renovation of the Georgian Grade II listed buildings is important for preserving the heritage of the city. The proposed plans offer a wide range of opportunities for different sectors of the community, including an educational space where children can come and learn about the history of the UK's oldest public outdoor pool. This is an exciting proposal which will benefit people of all ages throughout the year. 20/12/2016
Anita Winter 8 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP S 20/12/2016: I am very keen to see the pools reopen as I believe this will be an excellent facility for Bath residents and visitors alike. As a local resident I support the green travel plan in encouraging access by means other than cars. 20/12/2016
Cheryl Nield De Crespo 176 London Road West, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7QU S 20/12/2016: I support the application. 20/12/2016
Rosie Meachin 24 St Margaret's Street, Bradford On Avon, BA15 1DN S 21/12/2016: What a wonderful project. Both the local community and visitors from far and wide are so excited about the renovation of these pools. The plans look both inspiring and realistic. It's such a natural fit for Bath, with it's architectural and water heritage, it's a wonder it hasn't been done sooner. It will be a tremendous asset to the area, and I know so many people who can't wait to swim there. 21/12/2016
Ina Harris 3 Rhymes Place, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AG, S 21/12/2016: I am a trustee of the Cleveland Pools Trust so I am obviously a strong supporter. The trustees, all volunteers, along with many other volunteers, have worked hard for years to try to bring this lovely piece of Bath history back to life. The Pools have been a source of pleasure and well being for generations of Bathonians since 1817. The plan is to restore the oldest Pool, 1815-1817, and the lovely crescent of cottage and cubicles to as close to the original design as possible. The Ladies Pool is not being destroyed. Its historic importance is becoming more important with every piece of research and investigation undertaken. We aim to create a safe, affordable facility for the people of Bath to enjoy. 21/12/2016
Jacqui Lazare 34 Forester Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QE S 21/12/2016: I support this application and think it will be a real asset to Bath and the local area. However, I also acknowledge the comments made by the Highway Agency and wholly agree with their recommendations that the local parking restrictions are extended to Sundays to help ensure that local residents are not unable to park. 21/12/2016
Catherine March-Smith 14 Prospect Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5JD S 21/12/2016: I am supportive of this project for two main reasons - firstly, as a resident of Bath of over 10 years with a family who all love swimming, there is a terrible lack of good swimming facilities in the city - we go to Longwell Green for an indoor swim and either Cheltenham or Street for outdoor swimming. It will be a pleasure to use our own city's facilities - we can even walk to them. Secondly as the oldest surviving pool with the beautiful Grade 2 building in need of restoration, we have a chance to keep our history alive, which is increasingly important in a World Heritage Site like Bath. 21/12/2016
Shirley Davis 70, Tovey Crescent, Plymouth, PL5 3US, S 21/12/2016: The application fully supported. It will enhance the city of Bath 21/12/2016
Ruth Morris Heydon House, North Road, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6HP S 21/12/2016: This building is unique and as such should be saved from dereliction. 21/12/2016
Christina Craig Pump Cottage, Pulteney Gardens, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4JF S 21/12/2016: I support this application:
1) They Cleveland Pools are part of Bath's unique heritage. The Bath's are the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815) and are identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value. The plans will restore and re-use this Grade II* historic gem that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register.
2) A sympathetic and thoughtful restoration is proposed, as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
3) The Bath's will be a fabulous and unique community facility for residents and visitors alike
4) A “green travel plan” will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car;
5) There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents.
21/12/2016
Anne Kelsey 16 Beckford Gardens, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QU S 21/12/2016: I live very close to Cleveland Pools and would be delighted to see them restored. They would be an astonishing asset for the city and I am sure the would be well supported by residents and visitors. Having such a Georgian Jewel on my doorstep is wonderful and I hope we see the pools back in operation very soon. 21/12/2016
Alex Taylor 5 Kingsfield, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2NB S 21/12/2016: Please please can you refurbish and support the reopen this wonderful historic facility for future generations to enjoy how others did. Bath needs wonderful windows into our past which can be enjoyed and appreciated in the future by all. 21/12/2016: Please please can you refurbish and support the reopen this wonderful historic facility for future generations to enjoy how others did. Bath needs wonderful windows into our past which can be enjoyed and appreciated in the future by all. 21/12/2016: Please please can you refurbish and support the reopen this wonderful historic facility for future generations to enjoy how others did. Bath needs wonderful windows into our past which can be enjoyed and appreciated in the future by all. 21/12/2016
Vivienne Rickman-Poole 42 Newton Street, Llanberis, Gwynedd, LL55 4HN, S 21/12/2016: We need to protect our historic buildings for our future generations and advocate a lifestyle that promote health, fitness and wellbeing, what better way to combine this than with the restoration and reopening of this open air pool especially in the midst of the huge popularity of outdoor swimming. 21/12/2016: We need to protect our historic buildings for our future generations and advocate a lifestyle that promote health, fitness and wellbeing, what better way to combine this than with the restoration and reopening of this open air pool especially in the midst of the huge popularity of outdoor swimming. 21/12/2016
Dimo Dimov 2 Sydney Wharf, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4EF S 22/12/2016: This is an important historic site, currently at risk, the restoration of which would add to Bath's charm and appeal. The restoration is both sympathetic and thoughtful, showcasing the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK and providing a community facility for residents and visitors alike. 22/12/2016
Ronny Helvey 5 Edward Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4DU S 22/12/2016: I totallysupport this incredible initiative that will transform a derelict white elephant that pulls down the area to an asset that will add to the attractions of Bath and the community. 22/12/2016
Joanna Wright 5 Eden Terrace, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6TQ S 22/12/2016: This is a historic swimming pool that will benefit many, there has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents, therefore as long as public transport is included in the infrastructure on the east of Bath I feel it should be supported. 22/12/2016
Helen Kendall 30 Charlcombe Lane, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NS S 22/12/2016: It is important to save this unique pool. I wholeheartedly support the application. 22/12/2016
Tessa Rugg 3 Entry Rise, Combe Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5LR S 17/12/2016: I would love to visit the Cleveland Pools it's just what this city needs. 17/12/2016
Ed Timmas 3 Argyle Street, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4BA S 17/12/2016: Wonderful project which I can see bringing great joy to future generations of bathonians. This is a hidden gem in our city that must be given a new lease of life. 17/12/2016
Gill George 22 Monterey Close, Devon, TQ2 6QW S 17/12/2016: I support this application. Use of public swimming places like this is on the rise, with increasing demand driven by an increase in numbers of outdoor swimmers and an increase in 'staycations' and more people seeking leisure opportunities close to home throughout the year. In addition, this venue is a valuable part of our national heritage, being of architectural and cultural significance. 17/12/2016
Nicholas Hales 39 Uphill Drive, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6PB S 17/12/2016: I think this is a wonderful way to ensure Bath remains a top attraction for so many British and International visitors 17/12/2016
Sharon Cook 21 Heathway, Corsley, BA12 7PJ S 17/12/2016: A beautiful historic building and a valuable community resource. 17/12/2016
Brenda Abercrombie 12 Mount Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1LD S 17/12/2016: I wish to support this application, feeling that the Cleveland Baths would be a tremendous addition to the tourist appeal of Bath, as well as a valuable resource for the local community. Bath has always turned away from the river. This scheme will help develop the river bank area. A very exciting development. 17/12/2016
Melanie Hewitt 7 Evelyn Terrace, Fairfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6EX S 17/12/2016: I support the application 17/12/2016
Irlene Cooper 17 Bath Road, Atworth, Melksham , Wiltshire, SN12 8JJ S 17/12/2016: I have recently relocated from Bathford. I am aware of the tremendous amount of work done by the trustees, via my contact with Ina Harris, in bringing the project to its current state. Having come this far, it would be an absolute travesty for the final stages and reopening not to occur. 17/12/2016
Jeremy Gorbold 5 Bledlow Close , Newbury , RG14 6RX S 17/12/2016: It would be fabulous for this pool to be open again for people to use. 17/12/2016
Aimi Kuhlke 40 Newtown, Trowbridge, BA14 0BD S 17/12/2016: Great addition to the city 17/12/2016
Steve Wilkinson 260 Trowbridge Road , BA15 1EY S 17/12/2016: Support, please grant a year round licence so we can swim in the winter 17/12/2016
Michelle Walker 2 Stonewell Park Road, Congresbury , BS49 5DP S 18/12/2016: I think restoring this lido is a fantastic idea. We need more safe, clean and accessible outdoor swimming venues. 18/12/2016
Ian Howe 2 Elm Road, Wickford, Essex, SS11 7AF S 18/12/2016: I telly hope to be able to swim here in the near future. I love the plans! 18/12/2016
Ralph Oswick Flat 8 Victoria Bridge Court, Victoria Bridge Road, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3AY S 18/12/2016: I fully support this application 18/12/2016
Diana Jeater 1 Castle View, Sydney Wharf, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4EG S 18/12/2016: I am neighbour to the Cleveland Pools, as well as an historian who teaches a module on engagement with public history at Goldsmiths College, London. I have been following the plans for restoration of Cleveland Pools for around a decade, and I am certain that these proposals represent the best possible future for this historic site. I have been impressed by the care and consultation shown by the Cleveland Pools Trust, displaying real respect for the site as well as awareness of the need for any investment to be justified. Under their proposals, not only will Grade II* buildings be saved from decay, but the site will provide an excellent combination of educational and recreational opportunities. I hope to be able to use the pool if it is restored; and I certainly hope to be able to include it in my list of essential historical sites for understanding what happened to Bath beyond the core Georgian period. 18/12/2016
Julia Perryman 3 Marlborough Lane, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2NQ S 18/12/2016:
It involves the restoration and re-use of a Grade II* historic gem that's currently on the Buildings at Risk register;
A sympathetic and thoughtful restoration is proposed, as agreed by Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
It's the oldest surviving purpose-built outdoor public swimming pool in the UK (built c.1815);
Renovation and interpretation will tell the extraordinary story of the Pools;
It will be a community facility for residents and visitors alike;
It’s identified in Bath’s World Heritage Site Management Plan as one of the assets contributing to the city’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
The original ladies’ pool will be highlighted as part of a ‘Learning Centre’;
A “green travel plan” will encourage all users to come by bus, boat, on foot or by bike rather than by car;
There has been ongoing public consultation for the past ten years, including annual open days and presentations to local groups and residents.
18/12/2016
Josephine Cole Brook House, Dodmore Crossing, Westerleigh, Bristol, BS378QJ S View Associated Documents 18/12/2016
Annette Seatter 77 Bailbrook Lane, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7AL S 18/12/2016: I fully support the restoration of the Cleveland Pools. They would be a huge asset to the Bath community. They would be hugely popular and great for health, an enormous draw for tourists and would rightly preserve the area's heritage. To do anything other than restore these beautiful pools would be devastating. 18/12/2016
Teresa Langton Green Valley, Lyncombe Vale Road, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4LP S 18/12/2016: A wonderful opportunity to see this historic and unique pool restored with encouragement to reach it by sustainable travel options. I love to swim outside and would reach this complex either on foot or by bicycle along the canal towpath. 18/12/2016
Julia Pain 84 Broadmoor Lane, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4LB S 18/12/2016: It will be an amazing facility 18/12/2016
Clive Jones 10 Brook Drive, Corsham, Wilts, SN13 9AU S 18/12/2016: The re-opening of this wonderful facility would provide a great resource for residents and tourists alike. 18/12/2016
Bo Novak 40 Upper Regents Park, Bradford On Avon , Wiltshire, BA15 1EB S 18/12/2016: I SUPPORT the application.
I have lived in Bath and the surrounding area for a number of years now, and this is a fantastic project to provide outdoor swimming in a unique heritage environment.
This is such a historic and beautiful site, it deserves to be brought back into service.
And B&NES is not well served with swimming facilities currently.
There are great opportunities for external funding to help fund the redevelopment and the volunteers and fundraisers have come up with a practical and sensitive plan.
Cleveland Pools will be a terrific asset to the area! (I'm excited).
18/12/2016
Angie Olding 51 Ringswell Gardens, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6BN S 18/12/2016: Cleveland Pools is a historic site. Although it was abandoned and neglected it has the potential to be a great asset to the City of Bath. The restoration plans will revive a once popular destination for locals and visitors alike.

I support the application
18/12/2016
Kay Hinde 9 Alpine Gardens, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5PB S 18/12/2016: I fully support the planning application. To restore and bring back into use this historic site would be evidence that we care about preserving our heritage and the restored pools would be an asset to the city. 23/12/2016
Dr Lavinia Byrne 6 Cleveland Place West, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5DG S 18/12/2016: An excellent project that will do a great deal to enhance the reputation of Bath. 18/12/2016
Jeanne Beaton 61 Forrester Green, Colerne, Chippenham, Wilts, SN148EA S 18/12/2016: I wholeheartedly support the application. I visited the Pools on an open day this year when many people who, like me, swam there as chilldren, and it was wonderful and brought back many memories. 18/12/2016
Annika Blujm 9 Frankley Terrace, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DP S 18/12/2016: Having moved here from Hackney where the restoration & reopening of the London Fields Lido completely transformed the area for residents & families I am very aware of how positive a public, open air lido can be for the local area. Not only are the Clevelands historically & architecturally stunning, they could be a valuable asset to the community both from a social & educational point of view. The Cleveland Baths are a wonderful asset to our beautiful city. Please restore them & return them to all of the Bath community! 18/12/2016
Martin Pople 12 New King Street, Kingsmead, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2BL S 03/01/2017: I wholeheartedly support this application as the Cleveland Pools are an integral part of the city's rich cultural heritage and as such should be restored to their former glory for the benefit of residents and visitors alike. 03/01/2017
Julia Bazley Westoe, Llysworney, Vale Of Glamorgan , CF71 7NQ S 18/12/2016: Wow this looks great. I can't wait to swim here. This pool will attract many day tourists who will enjoy spending the day in the area and boosting the local economy. 18/12/2016
Carol Jenkins Garden Maisonette , 10 Brock Street, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2LN S 18/12/2016: I fully support this application. I was impressed after a tour of the site, at the moment a hidden gem. 18/12/2016
Kate James 173 Newbridge Hill, Newbridge, Bath, BA1 3PY, S 18/12/2016: a wonderful asset to Bath's heritage 18/12/2016
Alan Bennett 25 Raven Close, Weston Super Mare, BS22 8RD S 18/12/2016: This a major part of Bath's social history and the restoration would provide another great asset for the city. 18/12/2016
Jane Winstanley 12 Park Road, Newbridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3EE S 18/12/2016: As a long term resident of Bath I feel that Cleveland Swimming Pool was and could be again an important element to the wellbeing of the citizens of the city because
*There are not that many affordable swimming facilities within the city boundaries and those that there are are often not available for use at times when ordinary people may want to use them due to other commitments
*There is something very special about swimming outside and Bath is a Spa town and at the moment the only safe outside swimming opportunity is the rooftop pool at the Thermae Spa which even with the residents discount is not cheap and really only a treat
* As a child swimming in the Cleveland Baths was are regular part of my summer and during the summer of 1983 when the then new sports centre was undergoing one of its many refurbishments it was reopened and I regularly took my then three year old there to swim and play
*It is a beautiful and historic building that deserves to be reopened and shows that Bath has always been a forward thinking city that gave residents opportunities not offered by many other inland cities at the time
18/12/2016
Jonathan Durrant Westoe, Llysworney, Cowbridge, CF71 7NQ S 18/12/2016: The restoration of the pools is a great idea and would certainly attract me to the area for day or weekend trips. 18/12/2016
Su Bonner Hammerfield House,, Penshurst Road Penshurst , TN118HZ S 14/12/2016: Fully support the reinstatement and conservation of the pool and its buildings. 14/12/2016
Stephanie Hobbs 80 Holcombe Vale, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6UX S 14/12/2016: Would be lovely to get this back up and running. 14/12/2016
Sam Marsh 18 Innox Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1EG S 14/12/2016: What a fantastic opportunity to reinstate an iconic facility. I fully support this application, particularly given its consideration for sustainability and the environment. 14/12/2016
Rose 31 Millmead Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3JP S 14/12/2016: I would love to see the baths working again and I hope it will be affordable! 14/12/2016
Charmaine Campbell Coutinho 16 Thomas Street, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5NW S 14/12/2016: This is a wonderful idea that will build on the London Road regeneration work. Swimming is such an important and useful skill and I really believe this pool's reuse will make Bath a destination for swimmers and continue to add to its reputation for unique and special water experiences! Lido regeneration is rising in popularity so I think people will travel to Bath given elle this one's uniqueness. Xx 14/12/2016
Sarah Walton 63 Lansdown View, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1BQ S 14/12/2016: This will be an important community facility as well as a restoration of an historically interesting building. 14/12/2016
Siobhan Coyle 2 Bloomfield Crescent, Bloomfield, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2BE S 14/12/2016: Support 14/12/2016
Kim Tanner 68 Bloomfield Drive, Bloomfield, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2BG S 14/12/2016: Bath needs another recreational facility that its residents can use, especially during the warmer months. With increased obesity in children, it's an excellent way of keeping children fit and healthy whilst having outdoor fun! 14/12/2016
Su Trindle 41 Harcourt Gardens, Upper Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 4DL S 14/12/2016: This is a project of importance to locals as well as being of national historical importance. 14/12/2016: This is a project of importance to locals as well as being of national historical importance. 14/12/2016
Brian Neathey 3 BUDBURY RIDGE, Bradford-on-Avon , BA15 1QP, R 14/12/2016: this restoration is vital and should have been supported by the city council years ago.We need this beautiful place to still be here and in use for years to come. 14/12/2016
Stephen Bryant 92 The Butts, Frome, BA11 4AF S 14/12/2016: This is a wonderful iconic place if you had grown up in Bath and would only enhance Bath for both visitors and residents 14/12/2016
Charlotte Mullen 13 Windsor Castle, Upper Bristol Road, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3DN S 14/12/2016: I greatly support this application. 14/12/2016
Sadie Rhodes Flat C, 159 Fortess Road, , London, NW5 2HR S 14/12/2016: Please restore the pools for the benefit of Bath residents and heritage. 14/12/2016
Fay Greenhalgh 12 Chestnut Grove, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 2HH S 14/12/2016: This would be so good for Bath. It is very hot in the summer, look to the Pell's pool in Lewes for inspiration! 14/12/2016
Katherine Mallia 16 Saffron Court, Snow Hill, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DF S 14/12/2016: This is a great project which I support as my family will use the pools in the future 14/12/2016
Laura Denning Wisteria Cottage,, TQ10 9JL, S 14/12/2016: as an artist who has exhibited here and who hopes to in the future, this gem must be restored and cherished. 14/12/2016
Miss Mary IOrgan 12 Pulteney Gardens, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4HG S 14/12/2016: I was born in Bath and have lived here all my life and truly love this City. I remember going to the Cleveland Open Air Swimming Pool as a child and would love the opportunity to swim there again as an adult and to be able to see the next generation of children enjoying the pleasure of the pool. Bath is a city that has life due to water and the Romans so in the 21st Century lets honor that legacy. Thank you. 14/12/2016: I was born in Bath and have lived here all my life and truly love this City. I remember going to the Cleveland Open Air Swimming Pool as a child and would love the opportunity to swim there again as an adult and to be able to see the next generation of children enjoying the pleasure of the pool. Bath is a city that has life due to water and the Romans so in the 21st Century lets honor that legacy. Thank you. 14/12/2016
Rachel 51 Ringswell Gardens, Lambridge, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6BN S 14/12/2016: Please support this project for heritage and cultural purposes 14/12/2016
Simon Vowles Cotswold House, Bannerdown Road, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7LA S 14/12/2016: Fully support the renovation of this site. 14/12/2016
Hannah Sime 191 Newbridge Road, Newbridge, Bath, BA1 3HH, S 14/12/2016: This will be a great resource for local people, and will create memories for a new generation. 14/12/2016
Rita James Swan Hill Cottage, Kings Down, Corsham, SN13 8BP, S 14/12/2016: Very happy to see the pools restored and back in use again. 14/12/2016
Pauline Mungai 39 Rockliffe Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6QP O 14/12/2016: I would like to object to this plan.

Most importantly I would like to say that the scale of this application would be a blight on this heritage site, a blight to the area in the vicinity of this site and a blight to the people living in close proximity to it.

I have no objection to the cleveland pools being maintained and brought into public use but I do object to the way this would happen within this plan.

Firstly I do not think that the buildings and pools should be changed so radically. A heritage site should be in keeping with the original. I believe buildings should be maintained, rather than changed. I do not think this is the case within this plan. I do not think things should be knocked down or extra buildings built. I feel strongly that heritage sites are degraded by the inclusion of a kiosk/cafe/gift shop. And as for a toilet block on the river bank that floods every year, that is just wrong in so many ways - the potential for sewage to end up in the river, a new building right on the river bank where there are no buildings at all, indeed another new building on a heritage site. Toilets might be better accommodated within an existing structure.

In the Design and Access Statement it says “the Cleveland Pools Trust wishes to restore the historic open-air pools to their original use”. Their original use was cold water swimming, not heated. Again an instance within this plan which would not be in keeping with the original.

I would not like to see cleveland pools lose its intrinsic charm. The cleveland pools could be restored more sympathetically and be a lovely place for people to visit, have picnics by the river and generally enjoy this historic site without detracting from the general area. It would be lovely to see the cleveland pools site being used but the current plan is too ambitious and unsuitable and will be wholly detrimental to the families living in its neighbourhood. It is too costly in terms of finance and, because of this, too costly in its impact on the local community.

The plan as it stands will promote unacceptable noise in this quiet backwater, both from customers using the pool, getting to and from the pool, the provision of amenities to the pool, the collection of rubbish from the pool, etc. This application’s required opening hours are stated to be from as early as 7.00 am till 9.00 pm, 7 days a week inc bank holidays. (14 hours per day except for weekends which will be 13 hours per day). This will result in 96 hours per week. throughout the summer. I am told the capacity of this site at any one time is 240 people. Therefore within a 14 hour day, with turnaround, this could result easily in 1000 plus people accessing the site daily. This is a quiet residential area, not in the town centre, not on a main road, not in proximity to any industry. There are guidelines for times of the day when noise is not permitted in residential areas and 7.00 am until 9.00 pm would seem to exceed these.

I note there has been a habitat survey on the site so that it can be seen that the flora and fauna are being recognised and protected. However, it would appear that the local human population are much further down the scale (further down even than the pondweed) as there has been no impact assessment done for them, in fact they have never been engaged in any of the decisions made.

The footfall in this area is already planned to increase - the derelict houses at the bottom of Hampton Row are, at last, showing signs of being renovated into about 10 more dwellings (this will increase the number of homes in the street by about one third, with the possibility of the same increase in parking requirements) and the new development on the Warminster Road (old MOD site) I believe will have access to the canal and so may also increase the footfall of the street.

There is a travel plan that accompanies this application. In its ‘aim and purpose’ section it talks about encouraging customers to cycle to the pools. This will inevitably create the requirement for a large capacity cycle park. This street is narrow and there is no space for that. There is also a requirement for disabled parking and parking for the pools’ own buggies. It states that one of the purposes of this green travel plan is to reduce congestion! It will certainly not reduce congestion on this street or within the Bathwick estate area but will in fact increase congestion considerably. The travel plan blithely talks about ‘good community relations’. The immediate community has been wilfully ignored and deliberately sidelined and community relations with this project are, to date, bad.

The street where the cleveland pools is situated is a quiet cul de sac where children play on the street. There is a strong sense of community. It is an unsuitable environment for a busy, noisy commercial development. There are other ways to do this, with many more sympathetic ways of saving this heritage site.

14/12/2016
Lucy Symons 7 John Rennie Close, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1UJ , S 14/12/2016: I think it would be beautiful 14/12/2016
Melanie Sproat 1 Tory, Conigre Hill, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1NN, S 14/12/2016: This restoration project will add to the characteristics that make Bath special rather than just like many other bland city.
Also has so much to connect with past and present social history.
14/12/2016
Sarah Bridgwater Garden Apartment, 15 Johnstone Street, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 4DH, S 14/12/2016: I remember swimming in the Cleveland Baths in 1976/77 just before it closed. It was a wonderful experience and it would be lovely if future generations could have the same opportunity that I had. It is an iconic piece of architecture and so 'on trend' with outdoor swimming becoming so popular. 14/12/2016
Katherine Byles 5 Perrymead Court, Perrymead, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 5AZ S 14/12/2016: For Bath to have an outdoor Georgian bathing experience will be perfect for the city and it's visitors.
That it will be a freshwater outdoor pool will bring significant health benefits to the people of Bath. Every city should have one. It will be great to bring that area by the river to life.
14/12/2016
Lou Valdini 8 Southville Terrace, Lyncombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 4LZ S 14/12/2016: I support this application because a restored and accessible Cleveland pools will provide a unique insight into Georgian leisure time, and will be accretive to Bath's status as a Unesco World Heritage city. 14/12/2016
Edwina Mason Flat 13 Christchurch Hall, Julian Road, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2RB S 14/12/2016: Great project 14/12/2016
Emily Vass 8 Walcot House, Snow Hill, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6DD S 14/12/2016: I think it would be brilliant to have this historic place restored 14/12/2016
B Dickinson 5 Lampard's Buildings, Ballance Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2RW S 14/12/2016: The Cleveland Pools would be a great asset for Bath and the local community. 14/12/2016
Peter Clark 81 Lower Oldfield Park, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3HR S 14/12/2016: I fully support this long overdue scheme. 14/12/2016
Hugh Williamson 15 Victoria Gardens, Batheaston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7RD S 14/12/2016: I very much support this application. The Georgian lido in Bathwick is a unique part of the recreational heritage of the UK. Moreover, there is a vibrant volunteer community in Bath, including me, which would ensure that all funding made available for this project would be hugely leveraged. 14/12/2016
Jonathan Knee 79 The Hollow, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1NE S 14/12/2016: I support this application whole heartedly! Well done to all involved in this extremely important and unique project. 14/12/2016
M Robinson 51 Lower Bristol Road, Westmoreland, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3BE S 14/12/2016: will be nice to see it open again 14/12/2016
Sharon Evans 20 Hazel Terrace, Westfield, BA3 4BG, S 14/12/2016: This is a wonderful example of a project pulling local people together with wonderful memories of days gone by. Heritage should be preserved for new generations to see and we as a family will definately be using it as well as a fantastic tourist opportunity. For us we want a choice and fat enjoy swimming in a plastic indoor swimming pool or sport centre in the summer or for the brave winter. It encourages children and families to have a fun place to be together with plenty of space to share a meal afterwards to.

Mixed with the history on display and the hard working volunteers and founders of the project bath should be celebrating keeping this community gem.

We can't wait and hope we can visit by boat which elivates parking issues of how to get there.
14/12/2016
Isabel Utting Bopeep, Hammonds Green, TN22 5QH, S 14/12/2016: I think it's brilliant that this beautiful pool may be restored. Although I'm not local I love my local open air pool (lewes) and would love to visit this one one day. The open air pools bring so much joy and benefits to the local and wider communities. 14/12/2016
Beth Williams 11 Hill View Road, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6NX S 14/12/2016: Long awaited 14/12/2016
Sue C Wilson Rosebury, Khartoum Rd, Witley , Gu8 5rb, S 14/12/2016: This is a highly valuable project historically but for sport and open water swimming in general 14/12/2016
Marianne Conroy 83 Mount Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1LJ S 14/12/2016: Exactly what Bath needs to extend it's bathing heritage. 14/12/2016
Alison Miles Manning 110 Southdown Road, Southdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 1JJ S 14/12/2016: The restoration of The Cleveland Pools will provide a lovely amenity for everyone and be an asset to our World Heritage City. 14/12/2016
Rebecca Potter 48 Caledonian Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3RD S 14/12/2016: Cleveland pool is unique and the plans to restore them look excellent. They will be a real asset for Bath and should be supported. 14/12/2016
Anne Coppola Calderwood, Sham Castle Lane, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6JL S 14/12/2016: I believe it is absolutely vital to support this project.
It is a truly unique opportunity to maintain a precious piece of our city's heritage both for our community - both inhabitants and visitors, and for posterity.
It would be an amazing and unique resource.
14/12/2016
Ruth Hawkins 6 Warren Cottages, Church End, Barley, Herts, SG8 8JP, S 14/12/2016: I often visit my sister in Bradford on Avon and it would be great for this facility to be reopened for us and future generations. 14/12/2016
Joscelyne Beazley 24 Cynthia Road, Twerton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3QH R 14/12/2016: What a fantastic idea to restore this community pool. Heritage is not just about the Georgian buildings in Bath, it's memories for families and facilities for the community that are also important. 14/12/2016
Sarah Bateman 2 Audley Grove, Lower Weston, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 3BS S 14/12/2016: I fully support this application to create a wonderful resource for the community 14/12/2016
Iain Haysom 15 St George's Hill, Bathampton, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6RN S 14/12/2016: 14/12/2016
Adele Milton-Meakin 34 Oak Street, Westmoreland, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3BR S 14/12/2016: This is an excellent project. I look forward to seeing its completion and hope it will be priced accessibly for Bathonians to enjoy on a regular basis, rather than another expensive treat aimed mainly at tourists, like Thermae Spa. 14/12/2016
Andrew Vowles 11 Horton House, Forester Avenue, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6RB S 14/12/2016: I support this application. 14/12/2016
Jill Coles 7 Bell Close, Farmborough, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 0AP S 14/12/2016: I fully support this planning application to restore the historic Cleveland Pools. It will be an asset to the City of Bath and is part of the heritage of the city. It will allow visitors to experience open air swimming and will be wonderful for people of all ages. 29/01/2017 This comment also has associated documents: View Associated Documents
Jemma Crawley Dower House, Claverton Down Road, Claverton Down, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 7AD S 14/12/2016: It would be a travesty not to repair and reopen these wonderful baths again 14/12/2016
Kat Atack 123 Highfield Rd , Idle, Bradford , West Yorkshire , BD10 8QH S 14/12/2016: We need to keep our historic buildings in tip top condition and save these buildings! 14/12/2016
Eleanor Young 45 Minster Way, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6RJ S 14/12/2016: It would exciting to see the pools back in use 14/12/2016
Pip Cessford 78 London Road West, Lower Swainswick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 7DA S 14/12/2016: Full support of application 14/12/2016
Sally Parrott 3 Strathavon Close, Cranleigh, GU6 8PW, S 14/12/2016: SEen this lovely place from the river. It's utterly Bath. I can imagine Jane Austen's characters swimming here. I know the benefits of outdoor swimming because l swim in Guildford Lido. PLease bring it back to life. Sally Parrott 14/12/2016
Susan Crawford Ford House , Station Road Isfield, East Sussex , TN22 5XB, S 14/12/2016: This appears to be a very good idea and is going to be a really good addition to Bath. Can't wait to visit once open. 14/12/2016
J Pullan 26 The Tyning, Widcombe, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6AL S 14/12/2016: Support 14/12/2016
Siobhan Waterworth 7 Pera Place, Walcot, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 5NX S 14/12/2016: It would be wonderful if The Cleveland Baths could be restored 14/12/2016: It would be wonderful if The Cleveland Baths could be restored 14/12/2016
Michael Howard Coupe Calderwood, Sham Castle Lane, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6JL S 14/12/2016: Please support the restoration of these pools. They have historical, architectural and social value, and will bring a fantastic resource back to community use.

14/12/2016
Ailsa Russell 3 Chatham Park, Cleveland Walk, Bathwick, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 6JR S 14/12/2016: I fully support this application. It will be a great facility to have locally. I lived in london for many years and so enjoyed the benefits and community spirit of swimming regularly in a local lido. It will be such an asset to bath, and i am sure will increase visitors to local attractions in bathwick such as the holbourne museum. I sincerely hope this plan will be implemented. 14/12/2016
Simon Crowfoot Warleigh Lodge, Warleigh Lane, Bathford, Bath, BA1 8ED, S 14/12/2016: This is an architectural treasure that should be restored and become a vital part of bath for both locals and tourist a like. 14/12/2016
Rachel Lewis 10 Morford Street, Lansdown, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2RL S 14/12/2016: This is a very important historical renovation and will be a crucial community resource. 15/12/2016
Pam Bell Rose Cottage, Upper Cwm Nant Gam, Abergavenny, NP7 0RF, S 14/12/2016: This is a brilliant idea, in keeping with the area and will contribute greatly to the well-being of residents and visitors. 15/12/2016
Sarah Kimberling Gladstone House, Dafford's Buildings, Larkhall, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 6SH S 15/12/2016: I used to swim here as a child, an amazing pool. I would like my young son to experience it. Such a lovely walk to reach it too, along the canal. 15/12/2016
Bath Heritage Watchdog Not Given. S View Associated Documents 11/12/2016
Bath Preservation Trust 1 Royal Crescent, City Centre, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA1 2LR S 21/12/2016: Support: The Trust supports these proposals to restore this important historic and community asset and to bring it back to active public use. We congratulate the Cleveland Pools Trust on their committed and sustained efforts to reach this stage in the project. It is inevitable that with such an ambitious project there are challenges in conserving the fabric of the asset but these are, in our view, outweighed by the public benefits and the fact that the overall significance of the asset will be enhanced and better revealed to the public at large. We are confident to leave the finer details of conservation versus modernisation to the case officer, though we do question the loss of the staircase in the main cottage as this stair was and is a key part of the way the cottage has been used historically – ideally we would wish to see a solution that retains the historic arrangement. We understand that historic interpretation and education of the history of the site will be highly visible and accessible to the public on-site and we encourage this. 21/12/2016
Barbara Cutting 16 Cadbury Road, Keynsham, Bristol, Bath And North East Somerset, BS31 1JW S 13/12/2016: I fully support the plans for the return of Cleveland open air pool as a public pool once again. 13/12/2016
Kathryn Field 39 Berryfield Road, Bradford On Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1SZ, S 13/12/2016: The renovation of these historic pools will add beauty, historical significance and recreation to the area, in keeping with its amazing surroundings. 13/12/2016
Transition Bath 19 Maple Grove, Oldfield Park, Bath, Bath And North East Somerset, BA2 3AF S 08/12/2016: Transition Bath, as an organisation which promotes making Bath more sustainable supports this application. This renovation will be an exemplar for others to follow, being "the world’s first naturally treated, heated, outdoor swimming pool" and its water-source-heat-pump heating will minimise the pool's carbon emissions. 08/12/2016